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Photon336

  • one year ago

@Rushwr

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  1. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Going to post some problems

  2. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1443627181530:dw|

  3. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    is this Sn1/E1/E2/SN2?

  4. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1443628970316:dw|

  5. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1443629127898:dw| hey @Woodward how do we differentiate between E1/E2 SN1/SN2.. could really use your help here.

  6. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @cuanchi are you familiar with this?

  7. cuanchi
    • one year ago
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    sorry @Photon336 I am not very good at organic reactions

  8. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @Cuanchi seeing these reactions by themselves isn't as hard but when asked to identify whether E1/E2 SN1/SN2 it's not quite straightforward.

  9. cuanchi
    • one year ago
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    @Photon336 I never understood the E1/E2 SN1/SN2 I should read again organic substitutions and RMN, IR spectroscopy

  10. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @cuanchi i feel there's a fine line between a base and nucleophile, that's one thing i have problems with especially in these types of questions. also some of the rules for SN2 as well become fuzzy when we deal with like secondary substrates.

  11. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    if you want to review this stuff again I'll be happy to chime in

  12. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @Woodward is amazing at organic but he's not always around

  13. cuanchi
    • one year ago
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    @Photon336 what book do you follow for organic E1/E2 SN1/SN2?

  14. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @Cuanchi a good book i used is called clayden organic chemistry second edition

  15. cuanchi
    • one year ago
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    @Photon336 grate! I got it, thanks

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    heat favors elimination rxns.

  18. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @roast_master_says fascinating

  19. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    any reason why that's the case? or that's just something experimentally observed?

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I never said that substitution reaction wouldn't occur. As you slowly increase temperature though, elimnation reaction wins over substitution. this doesn't mean that its going to be 100% substitution or 100% elimination. as you increase temp, more energy is available. thus, the starting material can jump the activation barier better to result in elimination reaction thermodynamically favoirable. the full reaction, elimination begins with one, and results in 3 products (generally). whereas substitution = 2 products gibbs equation tells us there's increase in entropy as a result. the change in gibbs will evntually rule out making elimination more favorable.

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    as the change in gibb becomes more ngative.

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