anonymous
  • anonymous
medal-----I just need help figuring out this question not just the answer please The table below represents the velocity of a car as a function of time: Time Velocity (hour) (miles/hours) x y 0 50 1 52 2 54 3 56 Part A: What is the y-intercept of the function, and what does this tell you about the car? Part B: Calculate the average rate of change of the function represented by the table between x = 1 to x = 3 hours, and tell what the average rate represents. Part C: What would be the domain of the function if the velocity of the car was measured until it reached 60
Mathematics
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

Get this expert

answer on brainly

SEE EXPERT ANSWER

Get your free account and access expert answers to this
and thousands of other questions

anonymous
  • anonymous
Help please
anonymous
  • anonymous
Could you please help me if you can @Nnesha or @whpalmer4 or if you know someone you can tag to help
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
What is the definition of the \(y\)-intercept?

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
yes here
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
So, what is the definition of the \(y\)-intercept?
anonymous
  • anonymous
it is the point on a graph when the x is equalled to 0....?
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
Well, it's the value of \(y\) at the point on the graph where \(x=0\). Also the point where the graph crosses the \(y\)-axis.
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
So if we graphed the data in the table, would the \(x\)-axis be time, or velocity?
anonymous
  • anonymous
x wold be time because the velocity would be y
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
good. so now you can tell me the answer to part A...
anonymous
  • anonymous
so when x is 0 y is 50
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
Yes. And as \(x\) represents time, that's the initial velocity of the car, right? 50 miles/hour
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes so all i have to write would be.... the y intercept would be 50 if x is 0 im not sure how to word it
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
How about "the y-intercept of the function is 50 miles/hour"?
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok ..... :) but it also says what does this tell you about the car? i dont know how to figure that out or does that answer the entire question ? @whpalmer4
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
If you look back a few responses, I think you will find that I made a comment about what that represents...
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
The data in the table shows the car starting at 50 mph and going faster with each passing hour, right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes by 2 miles per hour
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
no, but close: it changes by 2 miles per hour per hour...
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
or miles/hour^2
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes :) your right
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
no, "you're right" :-)
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
On to part B! How do you find the average rate of change?
anonymous
  • anonymous
average rate of change for an function f(x) is intervals from a to b so the formula is f(b)-f(a) over b-a
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
okay, do you understand how to translate your table values into a,b,f()?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@whpalmer4 i was reading my notes from class would F(a) be x and f (b) be y
anonymous
  • anonymous
so would it be from the table 52-50 over 1-0 ??? not sure
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
Well, \(x\) takes on the values of \(a\) and \(b\) and \(y = f(x)\) So at \(x=1 \text{ hour}\) we have \(a = x = 1\text{ hour}\) and \(f(1) = \) what?
anonymous
  • anonymous
52
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
Yes. so \(a = 1\) and \(f(a) = 52\) Now how about \(b\) and \(f(b)\)?
anonymous
  • anonymous
b =2 and f(b)=2
anonymous
  • anonymous
f(b) =54 oops
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
why does b = 2? and f(b) is the value of the function at x=b=2, which doesn't appear to be 2 when I read the table... Here's the initial problem again: Part B: Calculate the average rate of change of the function represented by the table between x = 1 to x = 3 hours, and tell what the average rate represents. ^^^^^^^^^
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
well, my attempt to underline "\(x=3\)" didn't work so well!
anonymous
  • anonymous
ohhh So b =3 and f(b)=56
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
yes! we are trying to find the average rate of change over that 2 hour span, so \(a\) is the value of \(x\) or \(t\) at the start, and \(b\) is the value of \(x\) or \(t\) at the end, and \(f(a)\) and \(f(b)\) are the values from the table.
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
So our average rate of change between \(a\) and \(b\) is as your formula states: \[\text{avg rate of change} = \frac{f(b)-f(a)}{b-a}\]
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
Can you plug in the values?
anonymous
  • anonymous
56-52/ 3-1=4/2 =2
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
Okay, if you are going to write equations on one line like that, you MUST use parentheses appropriately to show what isn't being shown by position! what you wrote is actually equal to this: \[56 - \frac{52}{3} - 1 = \frac{4}{2}\] I know that isn't what you meant. (56-52)/(3-1) = 4/2 would unambiguously convey the intended meaning
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
What will the units for your answer be? miles? miles per hour? something else?
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh ok thanks for that tip and my units would be miles per hour or miles/hour
anonymous
  • anonymous
so ithe change of rate would be 2 miles per hour
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
right number, wrong unit \[\frac{56 \text{ miles/hr} - 52 \text{ miles/hr}}{3\text{ hr} - 1\text{ hr}} = \frac{4\text{ miles/hr}}{2\text{ hr}} = 2 \text{miles/hr}^2\] \]
anonymous
  • anonymous
can you explain why is it hr^2
anonymous
  • anonymous
I dont know how to get the little 2 sorry
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
right? if we continue accelerating at this rate, for every hour that passes, we will increase our speed by 2 miles/hour. If we accelerate for 10 hours, we will add \[10\text{ hours}*2\frac{\text{ miles}}{\text{hour*hour}} = 10\cancel{\text{ hours}}*2\frac{\text{ miles}}{\text{hour}*\cancel{\text{hour}}} \] \[= 20 \frac{\text{ miles}}{\text{hour}}\] to our speed
anonymous
  • anonymous
ohhh yes ........ :0
anonymous
  • anonymous
thanks for explaining it
anonymous
  • anonymous
my mom says we have to go to church can i see if your on later to finish :)
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
the way it "builds up" in physics terminology: \[x = v t\]distance = speed * time \[v = a t\]velocity = acceleration * time
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
Sure, say hi to the big guy for me :-)
anonymous
  • anonymous
lol i will thank you so much

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.