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anonymous

  • one year ago

Fan and Medal Which of these equations are linear equations?

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  1. vikstar2.0
    • one year ago
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    what are the equations

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{ x }{ 4 } - \frac{ y }{ 3 } = 1 \]

  3. vikstar2.0
    • one year ago
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    thats it or is there more

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    there is more

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    just wait im typing the equation

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{ 5 }{ x } - \frac{ 2 }{ y } = 7\]

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So is it: a)the first one b)the second one c)or both

  8. vikstar2.0
    • one year ago
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    @Hero @LynFran

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @vikstar2.0

  10. vikstar2.0
    • one year ago
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    i think it is both

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Hero

  12. vikstar2.0
    • one year ago
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    but most likely the first one

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i need the work though

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Anybody who can help me????

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @ayeshaafzal221

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @SolomonZelman

  17. vikstar2.0
    • one year ago
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    how am i supposed to show the work?

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    any equation in the form of y=mx+b is linear

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i thought it was supposed to be ax+by=c

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    anyways could u pls explain

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Hero

  22. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Try re writing both in linear form.

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    For the first one, I think it is 3x-4y=12, but I'm still not that sure how I got 12.

  24. Hero
    • one year ago
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    .Please show the work you did to get that.

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I cross-multiplied: 3(x) and 4(y), which gave me 3x-4y. And then I guess I multiplied the 3 and 4 and got 12. So 3x-4y=12

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Hero

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Where did @Hero go?

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Aw man, he's offline. :(

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @mathmate

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @dan815

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @pooja195

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @emily_wilson

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @SolomonZelman

  34. pooja195
    • one year ago
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    Is there a way you can post the questions and options in one post?

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I do not know. Do you want the options?

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @pooja195

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Hero

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Kate_J2002

  39. Hero
    • one year ago
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    The approach you took is not "algebraic" and would be considered an incorrect approach.

  40. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh sorry could you please help me to do it the correct way?

  41. Hero
    • one year ago
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    You don't cross multiply The difference of two fractions.

  42. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh ok.

  43. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Multiply both sides of the equation by the LCD

  44. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You mean the Least Common Denominator?

  45. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Exactly.

  46. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok let me try. Don't leave, please.

  47. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    But there are 2 fractions on one side of the equation, so how will I find the LCD?

  48. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm sorry for being so dumb.

  49. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Are you there @Hero ?

  50. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @pooja195

  51. Hero
    • one year ago
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    I'M here. The LCD is twelve. you should watch a tutorial on how to find the LCD of two fractions going forward though

  52. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Your talking about the first equation, right?

  53. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Correct.

  54. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok so I should multiply 12 with both the fractions and 1, right?

  55. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Correct

  56. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok.

  57. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Don't forget to cross cancel where possible.

  58. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So: 12x/4 - 12y/3 = 12 3x - 4y = 12

  59. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Correct

  60. Hero
    • one year ago
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    So you know the first equation is linear since it has the general linear form.

  61. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    OK NOW I GET IT! Isn't 3x - 4y = 12 a linear equation in standard form, which is ax - by = c

  62. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Now try writing the second equation In the same form.

  63. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok just wait. Please don't leave.

  64. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So 10 is the LCD for the second equation, right?

  65. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Tell me what is in the denominators of the fractions of the Second equation?

  66. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    x and y.

  67. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Explain how 10 Can be the LCD of x and y.

  68. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    OH WAIT SO YOU CANNOT FIND THE LCD FOR THE SECOND EQUATION BECAUSE THEY'RE VARIABLES. So that means it is NOT A LINEAR EQUATION, right?

  69. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Or am I wrong?

  70. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Actually, there IS an LCD for denominators x and y.

  71. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Is it xy

  72. Hero
    • one year ago
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    You find it the same way you found the LCD of 3 and 4

  73. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Correct

  74. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yay! But the second equation isn't a linear equation, right?

  75. Hero
    • one year ago
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    You have to SHOW that it isn't

  76. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I don't actually know how to do that.

  77. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Please help me out.

  78. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Try to write it in linear form. You already found the LCD. Remember what to do afterwards?

  79. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    OH YEAH! Just give a minute. I'll solve it out. Just stay there.

  80. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So: 5xy/1x - 3xy/1y = 7xy

  81. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Cross cancel

  82. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What are those?

  83. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Factors of one that allow you to Simplify expressions.

  84. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh ok.

  85. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Cross cancel

  86. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So: 5xy - 3xy = 7xy

  87. Hero
    • one year ago
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    You have good intention but that is not the correct Simplification.

  88. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    :(

  89. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    How do I do that?

  90. Hero
    • one year ago
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    What does x/x =1 mean to you?

  91. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    1/1=1

  92. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Well that would imply that x=1 but x is a variable

  93. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm confused.

  94. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Basically for any fraction, if you have a factor in the numerator and the same factor in the denominator of a fraction, then the factors cancel to just 1

  95. Hero
    • one year ago
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    The factors together Cancel to get 1 but a factor by itself does not equal one.

  96. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh ok but I don't know where this going.

  97. Hero
    • one year ago
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    For example, 7/7 =1 but 7 ≠1

  98. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok.

  99. Hero
    • one year ago
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    The way it's going is I can cancel any factor that occurs in both the numerator and denominator Without changing the value of the fraction.

  100. Hero
    • one year ago
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    So you should have ended up With:

  101. Hero
    • one year ago
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    5y-3x = 7xy

  102. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh ok

  103. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thank u very much @Hero ur the best.

  104. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Which can also be written as -3x + 5y = 7xy

  105. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so it is not a linear equation

  106. Hero
    • one year ago
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    But it is NOT Linear because 7xy is clearly not a constant,

  107. Hero
    • one year ago
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    So, yes, correct, not linear.

  108. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok

  109. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thank u very much @Hero

  110. Hero
    • one year ago
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    yw

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