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olivia78

  • one year ago

What is the area of the figure?

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  1. olivia78
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1443809633896:dw|

  2. olivia78
    • one year ago
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    i need help

  3. olivia78
    • one year ago
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    @Future_Einstein

  4. MrNood
    • one year ago
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    I assume that all the angles marked with squares are right angles so you have 2 rectangles: |dw:1443809856474:dw| can you see how I got that?

  5. Future_Einstein
    • one year ago
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    what is 27+27+72?

  6. olivia78
    • one year ago
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    yes the squares are right angles so do i multiply all the "rectangles" and then add them

  7. MrNood
    • one year ago
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    The area of a rectangle - I'm sure you know how to get that so subtract the small rectangle from the large one to get the answer (BTW @Future_Einstein - I think you are confusing the perimeter with th area)

  8. Future_Einstein
    • one year ago
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    dont listen to that there is an easier way

  9. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1443809865308:dw|

  10. olivia78
    • one year ago
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    ok

  11. Future_Einstein
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1443810054986:dw|

  12. Future_Einstein
    • one year ago
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    if the answer isn't 126 then ill delete my profile.

  13. olivia78
    • one year ago
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    so do i add or subract?

  14. MrNood
    • one year ago
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    So find the area of the 2 rectangles and subtract the smaller from the larger OR you go with @Future_Einstein |dw:1443810144627:dw| find £ rectangles and add them

  15. olivia78
    • one year ago
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    well idk which one of you is right.......

  16. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1443810075456:dw|

  17. MrNood
    • one year ago
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    we are both right - the answer will be th esame whichever way you do it

  18. Future_Einstein
    • one year ago
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    we both are technically but i find my aproach a lot easier. it is ultimately up to you.

  19. olivia78
    • one year ago
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    ooooh ya i get how you explain it mathstudent55 and also how you do it future einstein

  20. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    One way is to find the area of the large rectangle, 12 m by 15 m, and subtract the area of the small, cross-hatched rectangle, 6 m by 9 m.

  21. MrNood
    • one year ago
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    it is not 'technically' - we are both right -period. In my case you find 2 areas, in yours you find 3 - but I agree that either way is perfectly valid.

  22. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Another way is to break up the figure into 3 rectangle shown below: |dw:1443810228909:dw|