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HelloKitty17

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  1. HelloKitty17
    • one year ago
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    Read these sentences and answer the question that follows. The bus passengers were rowdy. The driver had to turn around to discipline the passengers. The driver took his eyes off the road. The bus weaved onto the shoulder of the road. Which of these best combines the ideas in the group of sentences above to make an interesting sentence? When the driver turned around to discipline some rowdy passengers, the bus weaved onto the shoulder of the road. Because the bus weaved onto the shoulder of the road, the passengers became rowdy and distracted the driver. The rowdy passengers caused the bus to weave onto the shoulder of the road while the bus driver was not paying attention. The distracted bus driver disciplined the passengers for making him weave onto the shoulder of the road.

  2. OregonDuck
    • one year ago
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    D

  3. HelloKitty17
    • one year ago
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    Read the sentence, then answer the question below. In the deep forest, the old trees can hear. This sentence contains alliteration personification metaphor simile metaphor right

  4. OregonDuck
    • one year ago
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    personification

  5. HelloKitty17
    • one year ago
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    how

  6. OregonDuck
    • one year ago
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    trust me i learned this in 4th grade

  7. HelloKitty17
    • one year ago
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    Which of these is an example of a metaphor? She is a rose without a thorn. My love is like a red, red rose. The flames made darkness visible. The wind was awake and disturbed the lake.

  8. OregonDuck
    • one year ago
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    A

  9. HelloKitty17
    • one year ago
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    Lines 16-30 below complete the story of Bertie and Aunt Agatha. Read the conclusion of the story and answer the question. from "EXTRICATING YOUNG GUSSIE" by P.G. Wodehouse 1.She sprang it on me before breakfast. There in seven words you have a complete character sketch of my Aunt Agatha. I could go on indefinitely about brutality and lack of consideration. I merely say that she routed me out of bed to listen to her painful story somewhere in the small hours. It can't have been half past eleven when Jeeves, my man, woke me out of the dreamless and broke the news: 'Mrs Gregson to see you, sir.' 2.I thought she must be walking in her sleep, but I crawled out of bed and got into a dressing-gown. I knew Aunt Agatha well enough to know that, if she had come to see me, she was going to see me. That's the sort of woman she is. 3.She was sitting bolt upright in a chair, staring into space. When I came in she looked at me in that darn critical way that always makes me feel as if I had gelatin where my spine ought to be. Aunt Agatha is one of those strong-minded women. I should think Queen Elizabeth must have been something like her. She bosses her husband, Spencer Gregson, a battered little chappie on the Stock Exchange. She bosses my cousin, Gussie Mannering-Phipps. She bosses her sister-in-law, Gussie's mother. And, worst of all, she bosses me. She has an eye like a man-eating fish, and she has got moral suasion down to a fine point. 4.I dare say there are fellows in the world—men of blood and iron, don't you know, and all that sort of thing—whom she couldn't intimidate; but if you're a chappie like me, fond of a quiet life, you simply curl into a ball when you see her coming, and hope for the best. My experience is that when Aunt Agatha wants you to do a thing you do it, or else you find yourself wondering why those fellows in the olden days made such a fuss when they had trouble with the Spanish Inquisition. 5.'Halloa, Aunt Agatha!' I said 6.'Bertie,' she said, 'you look a sight. You look perfectly dissipated.' 7.I was feeling like a badly wrapped brown-paper parcel. I'm never at my best in the early morning. I said so. 8.'Early morning! I had breakfast three hours ago, and have been walking in the park ever since, trying to compose my thoughts.' 9.If I ever breakfasted at half past eight I should walk on the Embankment, trying to end it all in a watery grave. 10.'I am extremely worried, Bertie. That is why I have come to you.' 11.And then I saw she was going to start something, and I bleated weakly to Jeeves to bring me tea. But she had begun before I could get it. 12.'What are your immediate plans, Bertie?' 13.'Well, I rather thought of tottering out for a bite of lunch later on, and then possibly staggering round to the club, and after that, if I felt strong enough, I might trickle off to Walton Heath for a round of golf.' 14.'I am not interested in your totterings and tricklings. I mean, have you any important engagements in the next week or so?' 15.I scented danger. 1.'Rather,' I said. 'Heaps! Millions! Booked solid!' 2.'What are they?' 3.'I—er—well, I don't quite know.' 4.'I thought as much. You have no engagements. Very well, then, I want you to start immediately for America.' 5.'America!' 6.Do not lose sight of the fact that all this was taking place on an empty stomach, shortly after the rising of the lark. 7.'Yes, America. I suppose even you have heard of America?' 8.'But why America?' 9.'Because that is where your Cousin Gussie is. He is in New York, and I can't get at him.' 10.'What's Gussie been doing?' 11.Gussie is making a perfect idiot of himself.' 12.To one who knew young Gussie as well as I did, the words opened up a wide field for speculation. 13.'In what way?' 14.'He has lost his head over a creature.' 15.On past performances this rang true. What is the best paraphrase of the story? Aunt Agatha likes to surprise her family members by showing up unexpectedly. Aunt Agatha uses her forceful personality to influence Bertie to go to America and rescue his cousin Gussie. Aunt Agatha wants Bertie to go to America to learn from his Cousin Gussie. Aunt Agatha pleads with Bertie to accompany her on a mission to save his Cousin Gussie in America.

  10. OregonDuck
    • one year ago
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    hurry plz i want my milkshake

  11. OregonDuck
    • one year ago
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    b

  12. HelloKitty17
    • one year ago
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    Read the excerpt from the passage and answer the question that follows. 13.'Well, I rather thought of tottering out for a bite of lunch later on, and then possibly staggering round to the club, and after that, if I felt strong enough, I might trickle off to Walton Heath for a round of golf.' 14.'I am not interested in your totterings and tricklings. I mean, have you any important engagements in the next week or so?' What does Bertie mean when he uses "totter" and "trickle"? Bertie means to show that he's bored with life. Bertie means to show that he's irritated by Agatha. Bertie means to show that he's a man of leisure. Bertie means to show that he's a serious person.

  13. HelloKitty17
    • one year ago
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    @Keygrover

  14. OregonDuck
    • one year ago
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    c

  15. HelloKitty17
    • one year ago
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    from "Was it a Dream?" by Guy de Maupassant On turning round I saw that all the graves were open, that all the dead bodies had emerged from them, and that all had effaced the lies inscribed—engraved or written on the gravestones by their relations, substituting the truth instead. And I saw that all had been the tormentors of their neighbors—malicious, dishonest, hypocrites, liars, rogues, calumniators, envious; that they had stolen, deceived, performed every disgraceful, every abominable action, these good fathers, these faithful wives, these devoted sons, these chaste daughters, these honest tradesmen, these men and women who were called irreproachable. They were all writing at the same time, on the threshold of their eternal abode, the truth, the terrible and the holy truth of which everybody was ignorant, or pretended to be ignorant, while they were alive. I thought that SHE also must have written something on her tombstone, and now running without any fear among the half-open coffins, among the corpses and skeletons, I went toward her, sure that I should find her immediately. I recognized her at once, without seeing her face, which was covered by the winding-sheet, and on the marble cross, where shortly before I had read: "She loved, was loved, and died." I now saw: "Having gone out in the rain one day, in order to deceive her lover, she caught cold and died." * * * * * * * It appears that they found me at daybreak, lying on the grave unconscious. Read the sentence from the passage and answer the question that follows. And I saw that all had been the tormentors of their neighbors—malicious, dishonest, hypocrites, liars, rogues, calumniators, envious; that they had stolen, deceived, performed every disgraceful, every abominable action Which word, if substituted for rogues, would best retain the meaning of the passage? Citizens Heroes Scoundrels Felons

  16. OregonDuck
    • one year ago
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    d

  17. HelloKitty17
    • one year ago
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    from "Was it a Dream?" by Guy de Maupassant On turning round I saw that all the graves were open, that all the dead bodies had emerged from them, and that all had effaced the lies inscribed—engraved or written on the gravestones by their relations, substituting the truth instead. And I saw that all had been the tormentors of their neighbors—malicious, dishonest, hypocrites, liars, rogues, calumniators, envious; that they had stolen, deceived, performed every disgraceful, every abominable action, these good fathers, these faithful wives, these devoted sons, these chaste daughters, these honest tradesmen, these men and women who were called irreproachable. They were all writing at the same time, on the threshold of their eternal abode, the truth, the terrible and the holy truth of which everybody was ignorant, or pretended to be ignorant, while they were alive. I thought that SHE also must have written something on her tombstone, and now running without any fear among the half-open coffins, among the corpses and skeletons, I went toward her, sure that I should find her immediately. I recognized her at once, without seeing her face, which was covered by the winding-sheet, and on the marble cross, where shortly before I had read: "She loved, was loved, and died." I now saw: "Having gone out in the rain one day, in order to deceive her lover, she caught cold and died." * * * * * * * It appears that they found me at daybreak, lying on the grave unconscious. Read the sentence from the passage and answer the question that follows. And I saw that all had been the tormentors of their neighbors—malicious, dishonest, hypocrites, liars, rogues, calumniators, envious; that they had stolen, deceived, performed every disgraceful, every abominable action Which word, if substituted for abominable, would best retain the meaning of the passage? Lovable Admirable Repulsive Average

  18. OregonDuck
    • one year ago
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    the last one was actually C

  19. OregonDuck
    • one year ago
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    and this one is c too

  20. HelloKitty17
    • one year ago
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    from "EXTRICATING YOUNG GUSSIE" by P.G. Wodehouse 1.She sprang it on me before breakfast. There in seven words you have a complete character sketch of my Aunt Agatha. I could go on indefinitely about brutality and lack of consideration. I merely say that she routed me out of bed to listen to her painful story somewhere in the small hours. It can't have been half past eleven when Jeeves, my man, woke me out of the dreamless and broke the news: 'Mrs Gregson to see you, sir.' 2.I thought she must be walking in her sleep, but I crawled out of bed and got into a dressing-gown. I knew Aunt Agatha well enough to know that, if she had come to see me, she was going to see me. That's the sort of woman she is. 3.She was sitting bolt upright in a chair, staring into space. When I came in she looked at me in that darn critical way that always makes me feel as if I had gelatin where my spine ought to be. Aunt Agatha is one of those strong-minded women. I should think Queen Elizabeth must have been something like her. She bosses her husband, Spencer Gregson, a battered little chappie on the Stock Exchange. She bosses my cousin, Gussie Mannering-Phipps. She bosses her sister-in-law, Gussie's mother. And, worst of all, she bosses me. She has an eye like a man-eating fish, and she has got moral suasion down to a fine point. 4.I dare say there are fellows in the world—men of blood and iron, don't you know, and all that sort of thing—whom she couldn't intimidate; but if you're a chappie like me, fond of a quiet life, you simply curl into a ball when you see her coming, and hope for the best. My experience is that when Aunt Agatha wants you to do a thing you do it, or else you find yourself wondering why those fellows in the olden days made such a fuss when they had trouble with the Spanish Inquisition. 5.'Halloa, Aunt Agatha!' I said 6.'Bertie,' she said, 'you look a sight. You look perfectly dissipated.' 7.I was feeling like a badly wrapped brown-paper parcel. I'm never at my best in the early morning. I said so. 8.'Early morning! I had breakfast three hours ago, and have been walking in the park ever since, trying to compose my thoughts.' 9.If I ever breakfasted at half past eight I should walk on the Embankment, trying to end it all in a watery grave. 10.'I am extremely worried, Bertie. That is why I have come to you.' 11.And then I saw she was going to start something, and I bleated weakly to Jeeves to bring me tea. But she had begun before I could get it. 12.'What are your immediate plans, Bertie?' 13.'Well, I rather thought of tottering out for a bite of lunch later on, and then possibly staggering round to the club, and after that, if I felt strong enough, I might trickle off to Walton Heath for a round of golf.' 14.'I am not interested in your totterings and tricklings. I mean, have you any important engagements in the next week or so?' 15.I scented danger. 16.'Rather,' I said. 'Heaps! Millions! Booked solid!' 17.'What are they?' 18.'I—er—well, I don't quite know.' 19.'I thought as much. You have no engagements. Very well, then, I want you to start immediately for America.' 20.'America!' 21.Do not lose sight of the fact that all this was taking place on an empty stomach, shortly after the rising of the lark. 22.'Yes, America. I suppose even you have heard of America?' 23.'But why America?' 24.'Because that is where your Cousin Gussie is. He is in New York, and I can't get at him.' 25.'What's Gussie been doing?' 26.Gussie is making a perfect idiot of himself.' 27.To one who knew young Gussie as well as I did, the words opened up a wide field for speculation. 28.'In what way?' 29.'He has lost his head over a creature.' 30.On past performances this rang true. What aspect of Bertie's character is revealed through his interactions with Aunt Agatha? He is disrespectful of women. He is jovial and light-hearted. He is self-conscious about his activities . He is weak-willed when it comes to family.

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