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vera_ewing

  • one year ago

Math question

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  1. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Well do you understand how to actually do it?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh boy.

  3. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Ok can you graph it on here, via draw tool

  4. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Nullius in verba, can you explain how you drew it, like what steps you took, I don't mean to doubt you, but I just want to know you understand :)

  5. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Ok lets look at B, a nice way to graph these, lets say without points (ignore the intersection right now) is by just using the intercepts, so what are the x and y intercepts for the equations in question B?

  6. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Lets focus on 3x-y=1, the x and y intercepts are a very easy way to graph lines, as we are basically just connecting the dots. To find the x - intercept we let y = 0 and solve for x, for y - intercept we set x = 0 and solve for y, so try finding the intercepts again for this equation.

  7. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    We are finding the intercepts, with the following method above, really what we're doing is finding two points which will let us graph the linear line. So we have the equation \[3x-y=1\] now lets solve for the intercepts, starting off by letting y = 0 (to solve for x intercept) \[3x-(0)=1 \implies 3x=1 \implies x = \frac{ 1 }{ 3 }\] so our x - intercept is 1/3 for this equation, which means we have the point \[(\frac{ 1 }{ 3 },0)\] similarly for the y - intercept we let x = 0 and solve for y, can you solve for y here?

  8. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    I think you meant y = -1 right?

  9. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Our point then is (0,-1) now we have two points for this equation (1/3,0) and (0,-1) and now we can graph this equation easily

  10. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1443831427421:dw| notice here we just connect the two dots and make our line

  11. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    I'm approximating in this graph, but I'm giving you an idea on how to graph a linear equation, there are many ways to do this, but this is a fast way, especially if you want to check your answers.

  12. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Now do the same with x+y = 3

  13. Zale101
    • one year ago
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    @vera_ewing you there?

  14. Zale101
    • one year ago
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    Awesome tutoring skills @Astrophysics !

  15. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Haha, thanks, I just want people to learn! If you don't understand something, feel free to ask @vera_ewing

  16. Zale101
    • one year ago
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    @vera_ewing , Astro is walking you through to get the answer because you didn't show any attempt. Does it make sense to you on how to graph linear equations now by using the method astro offered?

  17. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    You should know better than this by now, asking if your answer is correct is the same thing as asking for a direct answer when NO attempt is shown.

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