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anonymous

  • one year ago

What does positive charge and negative charge signify on a atom?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Does negative charge means excess of electrons or something or is it formal charges

  2. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @No.name

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes

  4. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    You mean like this right? for potassium |dw:1443930748032:dw|

  5. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    in terms of cation/anion(s) ?

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    wait

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1443930786260:dw|

  8. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @No.name the positive charge is called a carbocation the negative charge on the carbon is called a carbanion

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    agreed, but how does it bring a change about in the molecule

  10. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    nice question

  11. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @no.name please look at this figure tell me what you think |dw:1443930955082:dw|

  12. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    carbons always make four bonds, so in terms of reactivity, this means that something in this case a nucleophile will attack this.

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    it can have one more extra bond so positive , i suppose

  14. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @No.name look at this. can you tell me which one is the nucleophile which is the electrophile and how this reaction would go? |dw:1443931119460:dw|

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    cl- is nucleophile

  16. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    This will help to show you the importance of the carbocation in these types of reactions.

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i have not yet started mechanisms , but yeah i get a idea what you are trying to say!

  18. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1443931262627:dw|

  19. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    check this out

  20. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @No.name carbon must always make 4 bonds, there is no exception to this rule.

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    nice i get it , yeah i learnt that carbocation and carbanion are reaction intermediates , but needed someone to reinforce it , now the picture is clear thanks buddy!

  22. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    one more thing

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes

  24. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    do you know what a carbanion does?

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yeah

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    heterolytic bon cleavage .........

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    both the lone pairs go to the carbon

  28. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    yep, also there's a charge sitting on the carbon atom, depending on what atoms you have in your molecule this charge will be unstable. see the molecule below. |dw:1443931494309:dw|

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1443931540904:dw|

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i didn't get the figure

  31. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    you mean what i drew right?

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh yes

  33. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    FYI this would be very hard to do but just to give you an example |dw:1443931658624:dw|

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes got it

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    just out of curiosity , it might be a lame question can it form a co-oridnate bond with some electrophile

  36. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    hey @no.name can you show me by drawing that out?

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