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iwanttogotostanford

  • one year ago

SAT PRACTICE MATH QUESTION URGENT: If an oil tank contains 60 gallons of fuel and is 5/12 full, how many gallons does the tank hold when full?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    60*12/5=?

  2. iwanttogotostanford
    • one year ago
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    @Vocaloid @zepdrix

  3. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    (5/12)*x = 60 where x = the full tank solve for x

  4. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    still there?

  5. iwanttogotostanford
    • one year ago
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    yes, sorry @Vocaloid

  6. iwanttogotostanford
    • one year ago
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    @Nnesha @zepdrix

  7. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1443990443635:dw|It might be easier if you just draw an illustration of what is going on.

  8. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    So I took a tank or box, and split it into 12 parts. When 5 of them are full, the tank has 60 gallons. So how much does each "twelfth" contain? each cell.

  9. iwanttogotostanford
    • one year ago
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    I am guessing it would end up to be 128???@zepdrix do you have any other "strategic" way to do this problem???

  10. iwanttogotostanford
    • one year ago
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    @zepdrix

  11. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    5/12 is 60. So this problem is 2 steps: Figure out how much 1/12 is. Then figure out how much 12/12 is. If 5/12 is 60, Then 1/12 is that same 60 but divided by 5, ya?

  12. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Come onnnnn broski >.< You gotta respond if you wanna go to Stanford! lol

  13. iwanttogotostanford
    • one year ago
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    i know

  14. iwanttogotostanford
    • one year ago
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    haha

  15. iwanttogotostanford
    • one year ago
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    math is my "worst" subject

  16. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    We have 5 parts giving us 60. How big are each of those parts?

  17. iwanttogotostanford
    • one year ago
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    12/

  18. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Ok good. So each part is 12 gallons. That "part" represents 1/12 of the entire tank. So to fill up the tank completely, we need 12 of those.

  19. iwanttogotostanford
    • one year ago
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    ok

  20. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    So how much is that? :) 12 of those 12 gallons?

  21. iwanttogotostanford
    • one year ago
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    144?? ....

  22. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    yay good job \c:/

  23. iwanttogotostanford
    • one year ago
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    so thats all?? It takes 144 gallons?

  24. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    yes. maybe the fractions are what's giving you some trouble here... If we take out the fraction business. This problem really boils down to: ~How many gallons in one part ~How many parts in total

  25. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    So it requires a division step, which tells you how many gallons in each part then a multiplication step, multiplying the `gallons per part` by the `number of parts`

  26. iwanttogotostanford
    • one year ago
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    oh ok

  27. iwanttogotostanford
    • one year ago
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    but the actual answer to the problem is 128

  28. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    it is? 0_o sec lemme reread it :D lol

  29. iwanttogotostanford
    • one year ago
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    ok!

  30. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Are you sure you matched up the answer key correctly? 0_o It should be 144... hmm weird 5/12 is 60 so 10/12 is 120 and 2/12 is two of those 12's. I don't see any way to get to 128.

  31. iwanttogotostanford
    • one year ago
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    ah yes it is 144.... i marked my own answer wrong too lol

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