iwanttogotostanford
  • iwanttogotostanford
SAT PRACTICE MATH QUESTION URGENT: If an oil tank contains 60 gallons of fuel and is 5/12 full, how many gallons does the tank hold when full?
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
60*12/5=?
iwanttogotostanford
  • iwanttogotostanford
@Vocaloid @zepdrix
Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
(5/12)*x = 60 where x = the full tank solve for x

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Vocaloid
  • Vocaloid
still there?
iwanttogotostanford
  • iwanttogotostanford
yes, sorry @Vocaloid
iwanttogotostanford
  • iwanttogotostanford
@Nnesha @zepdrix
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
|dw:1443990443635:dw|It might be easier if you just draw an illustration of what is going on.
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
So I took a tank or box, and split it into 12 parts. When 5 of them are full, the tank has 60 gallons. So how much does each "twelfth" contain? each cell.
iwanttogotostanford
  • iwanttogotostanford
I am guessing it would end up to be 128???@zepdrix do you have any other "strategic" way to do this problem???
iwanttogotostanford
  • iwanttogotostanford
@zepdrix
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
5/12 is 60. So this problem is 2 steps: Figure out how much 1/12 is. Then figure out how much 12/12 is. If 5/12 is 60, Then 1/12 is that same 60 but divided by 5, ya?
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Come onnnnn broski >.< You gotta respond if you wanna go to Stanford! lol
iwanttogotostanford
  • iwanttogotostanford
i know
iwanttogotostanford
  • iwanttogotostanford
haha
iwanttogotostanford
  • iwanttogotostanford
math is my "worst" subject
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
We have 5 parts giving us 60. How big are each of those parts?
iwanttogotostanford
  • iwanttogotostanford
12/
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Ok good. So each part is 12 gallons. That "part" represents 1/12 of the entire tank. So to fill up the tank completely, we need 12 of those.
iwanttogotostanford
  • iwanttogotostanford
ok
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
So how much is that? :) 12 of those 12 gallons?
iwanttogotostanford
  • iwanttogotostanford
144?? ....
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
yay good job \c:/
iwanttogotostanford
  • iwanttogotostanford
so thats all?? It takes 144 gallons?
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
yes. maybe the fractions are what's giving you some trouble here... If we take out the fraction business. This problem really boils down to: ~How many gallons in one part ~How many parts in total
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
So it requires a division step, which tells you how many gallons in each part then a multiplication step, multiplying the `gallons per part` by the `number of parts`
iwanttogotostanford
  • iwanttogotostanford
oh ok
iwanttogotostanford
  • iwanttogotostanford
but the actual answer to the problem is 128
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
it is? 0_o sec lemme reread it :D lol
iwanttogotostanford
  • iwanttogotostanford
ok!
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Are you sure you matched up the answer key correctly? 0_o It should be 144... hmm weird 5/12 is 60 so 10/12 is 120 and 2/12 is two of those 12's. I don't see any way to get to 128.
iwanttogotostanford
  • iwanttogotostanford
ah yes it is 144.... i marked my own answer wrong too lol

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