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anonymous

  • one year ago

If a torque of 36 N⋅m about the x axis is required to tighten the nut, determine the required magnitude of the force F that the man's foot must apply on the end of the wrench in order to turn it. Force F lies in a vertical plane.

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  1. mathmate
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1444006432871:dw| Torque = F * D = 36 N-m You need to know the distance (approximately the length of the wrench) D to find the required force. The longer the distance D, the smaller the force F.

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Need distance

  3. Koikkara
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1445173888264:dw|

  4. Koikkara
    • one year ago
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    Lets have a look at the relation : |dw:1445174705291:dw| Relationship between force F, torque τ, linear momentum p, and angular momentum L in a system which has rotation constrained in one plane only (forces and moments due to gravity and friction not considered).

  5. Koikkara
    • one year ago
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    @tqchase |dw:1445174908564:dw| A particle is located at position r relative to its axis of rotation. When a force F is applied to the particle, only the perpendicular component F⊥ produces a torque. This torque τ = r × F has magnitude τ = |r| |F⊥| = |r| |F| sinθ and is directed outward from the page.

  6. Koikkara
    • one year ago
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    @tqchase The magnitude τ of the torque is given by \(\huge\mathcal{τ = rF\sin\theta}\) where r is the distance from the axis of rotation to the particle, F is the magnitude of the force applied, and θ is the angle between the position and force vectors

  7. Koikkara
    • one year ago
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    Simple Method: The direction of the torque can be determined by using the right hand grip rule: if the fingers of the right hand are curled from the direction of the lever arm to the direction of the force, then the thumb points in the direction of the torque.

  8. Koikkara
    • one year ago
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    Using, \(\huge\mathcal{τ = r ×F }\) where \(τ\) is the torque , r is the displacement vector (a vector from the point from which torque is measured (typically the axis of rotation) to the point where force is applied), F is the force vector, @tqchase τ = 36 Nm

  9. Koikkara
    • one year ago
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    Since Given data is inconvenient for calculation, I may give it a try this way. \(NOTE:\) Approve from Qualified Helpers or Other Engineers. Now, consider \(force_~acting_~in_~vertical_~direction\), then, \(G= 9.81 m/s^2\), Also, \(T = 36 Nm\), Now, \(F=mass× acceleration\)..

  10. Koikkara
    • one year ago
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    @mathmate I think i'm doing good few min before...now how can you solve ?

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