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anonymous

  • one year ago

Medal award! What are the positive and negative measures of the closest coterminal angles to 1.1 radians?

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  1. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Hmm I don't understand the question :d Do they want the degree measure? Or they want the closest "special angle" maybe?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I think they want radians

  3. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Hmm ok :) Then for co-terminal we want to spin a full rotation around the circle and land in the same spot. So one co-terminal angle would be: \(\large\rm 1.1+2\pi\)

  4. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    How bout if we want to spin backwards? Any ideas? :)

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the thing is I believe they want us to convert the 1.1 into a fraction

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    and of course you will go clockwise for the negative :)

  7. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Hmm there is no reason for us to write as a fraction if we're staying in radians. Unless you want to relate it to one of your special angles. 1.1 radians is approximately 31.5 degrees which is approximately pi/6. But I don't think that's what they're asking for. Hmmm....

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I put in 11pi/10-10pi/5 which is -9pi/10 for the negative angle. and for the positive 11pi/10+10pi/5 which is 31pi/10 but that is incorrect.

  9. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Well keep in mind that:\[\large\rm 1.1=\frac{11}{10}\]\[\large\rm 1.1\ne\frac{11\pi}{10}\]

  10. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    You can get a common denominator if you like,\[\large\rm \frac{11}{10}+\frac{20\pi}{10}=\frac{11+20\pi}{10}\]But it looks a lot nicer if you just leave it as \(\large\rm 1.1+2\pi\)

  11. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Just don't combine the numerators:\[\large\rm 11+20\pi\ne31\pi\]:)

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so for the positive angle it would just be 1.1+2pi?

  13. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    ya i think that's all they want us to input. Do you get multiple guesses? XD

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I get 3 attempts and then I get a new problem

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    and for the negative it was be 1.1-2pi?

  16. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    yes

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    that's correct :) thanks so much

  18. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    yay team \c:/

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    :D

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