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anonymous

  • one year ago

How do I solve this problem? The volumes of two cylindrical cans of the same shape vary directly as the cubes of their radii. If a can with a six-inch radius holds 1½ pints, how many gallons will a similar can with a 24-inch radius hold?

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  1. dan815
    • one year ago
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    how many pints is a gallon

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I don't know, I'll have to google it.

  3. dan815
    • one year ago
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    okay do that

  4. dan815
    • one year ago
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    now the volumes of these 2 objects vary as a function of the cubes of their radii

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    8

  6. dan815
    • one year ago
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    lets suppose Volume of Can A = k*r^3 volume of can B = k*R^3 where R= 24 and r=6 we want to see how many of Can A fit in can B so we know hoiw many pints or gallons go in there

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh, I just feel so stressed and it makes difficult for me to comprehend.

  8. dan815
    • one year ago
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    okay dont worry we will take this slow

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So, what's the very first step in this problem?

  10. dan815
    • one year ago
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    How do I solve this problem? The volumes of two cylindrical cans of the same shape vary directly as the cubes of their radii.

  11. dan815
    • one year ago
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    The volumes of two cylindrical cans of the same shape vary directly as the cubes of their radii.

  12. dan815
    • one year ago
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    read this sentence

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    It says you've been typing for a while. Is that an error?

  14. dan815
    • one year ago
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    let Vol_A be the volume of can with radius r = 6 inches Vol_A=k*r^3 Vol_A is varying with respect to r^3 so some constant k times r^3

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Is there a significance to your typing of the _ symbol?

  16. dan815
    • one year ago
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    no =.= its just a label for the variable

  17. dan815
    • one year ago
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    let Vol_B be the volume of can with radius R=24 inches Vol_B=k*R^3 Vol_B is varying with respect to R^3 so some constant k(notice same constant) times R^3

  18. dan815
    • one year ago
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    now what we want to know is how many times bigger volume B is than volume A

  19. dan815
    • one year ago
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    then we will know how many of Vol_A will fit in volume_B

  20. dan815
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1444022480876:dw|

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I don't know.

  22. dan815
    • one year ago
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    maybe this picture will help

  23. dan815
    • one year ago
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    if we know how many times bigger the volume of B is than A then we know how many of A will fit in B

  24. dan815
    • one year ago
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    and each A is 1.5 pints

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok.

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Do we have any numbers concerning B?

  27. dan815
    • one year ago
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    yes

  28. dan815
    • one year ago
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    suppose i give u 2 numbers 20 and 3 how many times is 20 bigger than 3, what will ud o

  29. dan815
    • one year ago
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    do

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    divided 20 w/ 3

  31. dan815
    • one year ago
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    right

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    6.666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666

  33. dan815
    • one year ago
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    in the same way u have VolB= k*R^3 volA=k*r^3 how many A fit in B?

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1444022694437:dw|

  35. dan815
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1444022725772:dw|

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You know, without knowing the numbers, it makes me unsure, but if I had to guess, I'd just divided the two K x r^3

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