ilovebmth1234
  • ilovebmth1234
HELP!! ill give a medal and fan!! <3 Annotate the story? can someone please help me!!! the short story is in the comment section
English
chestercat
  • chestercat
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At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

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ilovebmth1234
  • ilovebmth1234
Of Plymouth Plantation, Chapter XI In these hard and difficult beginnings they found some discontents and murmurings arise amongst some, and mutinous speeches and carriages in other; but that which was most sad and lamentable was, that in 2 or 3 months' time half of their company died. In these hard and difficult beginnings they found some discontents and murmurings arise amongst some, and mutinous speeches and carriages in other; but they were soon quelled -- particularly with regard to things considered bad or disagreeable and overcome by the wisdom, patience, and just and equal arrange of things by the Governor and better part, which But that which was most sad and lamentable was, that in 2 or 3 months' time half of their company died, especially in January: and February, being the depth of winter, and wanting houses and other comforts; being infected with the scurvy and other diseases, which this long voyage and their unaccommodated condition had brought upon them; so as there died some times 2 or 3 of a day, in the foresaid time; that of 100 and odd persons, scarce 50 remained.And of these in the time of most distress, there was but 6 or 7 sound persons, who, to their great commendations be it spoken, spared no pains, night nor day, but with abundance of toil and hazard of their own health, fetched them wood, made them fires, dressed them meat, made their beds, washed their clothes, clothed and unclothed them; in a word, did all the homely and necessary offices for them which dainty and queasy stomachs cannot endure to hear named; and all this willingly and cheerfully, without any grudging in the least, showing herein their true love unto their friends and brethren. A rare example and worthy to be remembered. Two of these were Mr. William Brewster, their reverend Elder, and Myles Standish, their Captain and military commander, unto whom myself, and many others, were much beholden in our low and sick condition. Yet the Lord so upheld these persons, as in this general calamity they were not at all infected either with sickness, or lameness. And what I have said of these, I may say of many others who died in this general visitation, and others yet living, that whilst they had health, yea, or any strength continuing, they were not wanting to any that had need of them. And I doubt not but their recompense is with the Lord. LeftImg Ends From "Indian Relations" All this while the Indians came skulking about them, and would sometimes show themselves aloof off, but when any approached near them, they would run away. And once they stole away their tools where they had been at work, and were gone to dinner. But about the 16th of March a certain Indian came boldly amongst them, and spoke to them in broken English, which they could well understand, but marveled at it. At length they understood by discourse with him, that he was not of these parts, but belonged to the eastern parts, where some English-ships came to fish, with whom he was acquainted, and could name sundry of them of their names, amongst whom he had got his language. He became profitable to them in acquainting them with many things concerning the state of the country in the east-parts where he lived, which was afterwards profitable unto them; as also of the people hear, of their names, number, and strength; of their situation and distance from this place, and who was chief amongst them.He became profitable to them in acquainting them with many things concerning the state of the country in the east-parts where he lived, which was afterwards profitable unto them; as also of the people hear, of their names, number, and strength; of their situation and distance from this place, and who was chief amongst them. His name was Samaset; he told them also of another Indian whose name was Squanto, a native of this place, who had been in England and could speak better English then himself. Being, after some time of entertainment and gifts, dismissed, a while after he came again, and 5 more with him, and they brought again all the tools that were stolen away before, and made way for the coming of their great Sachem, called Massasoyt; who, about 4 or 5 days after, came with the chief of his friends and other attendance, with the aforesaid Squanto. With whom, after friendly entertainment, and some gifts given him, they made a peace with him (which hath now continued this 24 years) in these terms. 1. That neither he nor any of his, should injure or do hurt to any of their people. 2. That if any of his did any hurt to any of theirs, he should send the offender, that they might punish him. 3. That if anything were taken away from any of theirs, he should cause it to be restored; and they should do the like to his. 4. If any did unjustly war against him, they would aide him; if any did war against them, he should aide them. 5. He should send to his neighbors' confederates, to certify them of this, that they might not wrong them, but might be likewise comprised in the conditions of peace. 6. That when their men came to them, they should leave their bows and arrows behind them. After these things he returned to his place called Sowams, some 40 mile from this place, but Squanto continued with them, and was their interpreter, and was a special instrument sent of God for their good beyond their expectation. He directed them how to set their corn, where to take fish, and to procure other commodities and was also their pilot to bring them to unknown places for their profit, and never left them till he died. He was a native of this place, and scarce any left alive besides himself.
Shikamaru11
  • Shikamaru11
dude so lengthy
ilovebmth1234
  • ilovebmth1234
i know /.\ im sorry i didn't think it'll look that long... in the document i have it in it only has like 3 sections of small paragraphs

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ilovebmth1234
  • ilovebmth1234
anonymous
  • anonymous
highlight January: and February, being the depth of winter, and wanting houses and other comforts; being infected with the scurvy and other diseases,
ilovebmth1234
  • ilovebmth1234
okay anything else?
anonymous
  • anonymous
He directed them how to set their corn, where to take fish, and to procure other commodities and was also their pilot to bring them to unknown places
anonymous
  • anonymous
thats all i see as far as highlights
Shikamaru11
  • Shikamaru11
it's ok :)
ilovebmth1234
  • ilovebmth1234
okay :3 iss there anything else t hat needs done?

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