anonymous
  • anonymous
Why are enzymes necessary? to retard the rate of decomposition to act as a catalyst in chemical reactions to conserve the stored energy of a cell
Biology
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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aaronq
  • aaronq
enzymes are the workers of living organisms, they accelerate the rate of necessary chemical reactions to a rate acceptable for homeostasis to be maintained
anonymous
  • anonymous
this is a tough one. cause there are different thing that enzymes are nessicary for, however , i would have to say to act as a catalyst in chemical reactions. (Enzymes as catalysts Enzymes are mainly globular proteins - protein molecules where the tertiary structure has given the molecule a generally rounded, ball shape (although perhaps a very squashed ball in some cases). The other type of proteins (fibrous proteins) have long thin structures and are found in tissues like muscle and hair. We aren't interested in those in this topic. These globular proteins can be amazingly active catalysts. You are probably familiar with the use of catalysts like manganese(IV) oxide in decomposing hydrogen peroxide to give oxygen and water. The enzyme catalase will also do this - but at a spectacular rate compared with inorganic catalysts. One molecule of catalase can decompose almost a hundred thousand molecules of hydrogen peroxide every second. That's very impressive! This is a model of catalase, showing the globular structure - a bit like a tangled mass of string:) http://www.chemguide.co.uk/organicprops/aminoacids/enzymes.html
anonymous
  • anonymous
although @aaronq is correct, i dont think he explained it all the way. i hope this helped ^_^

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anonymous
  • anonymous
so, yes, its acts as a catalyst
anonymous
  • anonymous
@死は最高です @aaronq Ok thank you both
anonymous
  • anonymous
^_^ no problem. please remember to give a medal to whomever you wish ^_^

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