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anonymous

  • one year ago

Please help!! medal will be given! Summarize the successes and failures of Reconstruction, and evaluate the overall effectiveness of Reconstruction efforts. Consider the historical impact of the political struggles over Reconstruction plans and the Reconstruction Acts passed by Congress. Also explain the resistance to Reconstruction and the effect of the 1877 Compromise.

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i remember when i had trouble with this particular question...sadly i don't recall what i had answered but i'll try to the best of my ability.

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    President Lincoln's original goal in the Civil War was to hold the nation together. And in this, the war and Reconstruction were a success. The Confederacy was destroyed for good, and every state that had seceded was readmitted to the Union. In fact, the Civil War went a step further in terms of public thought. American historian Shelby Foote noted 'Before the war it was said 'the United States are.' Grammatically it was spoken that way and thought of as a collection of independent states. And after the war it was always 'the United States is,' as we say today without being self-conscious at all. And that sums up what the war accomplished. It made us an 'is'. The federal government outlawed slavery with the 13th Amendment, defined citizenship and protected all Americans under the law with the 14th Amendment and extended suffrage to all men in the 15th Amendment. Federal legislation, like the Freedman's Bureau and the Civil Rights Act, worked to get African Americans back on their feet and participating equally in the government, society and economy. Black men were elected to every level of government, including governors and senators. All of the Southern states drafted new constitutions and ratified the Reconstruction Amendments. Many African Americans participated in new state and local governments, which worked for equal rights and to rebuild or create services like schools, railroads, hospitals, housing, roads and asylums. Charitable organizations and individuals - especially Northerners - worked to improve literacy and education for African Americans. Businessmen opened new industries, like steel, cotton and lumber mills to revitalize the economy. New cultural venues opened. Black institutions and churches gained autonomy.

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thank chu so much!!!

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thats just the successes though

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    still working on the failures hold on.

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Despite these many achievements, Reconstruction faced tremendous challenges, many of them (but not all of them) because of white resistance. In the early years of Reconstruction, the new state governments had many competent but inexperienced leaders. A few were carpetbaggers motivated by greed and corruption. Southern whites were often uncooperative with new legislation passed by blacks or Yankees. The vigilante groups, like the Ku Klux Klan, emerged to maintain white supremacy and intimidate black voters or any whites who supported them. And although there was some industrialization, the region remained committed to an agricultural economy and used sharecropping as a legal means to ensure that blacks would still work the land that whites still owned. As soon as former Confederates had their right to vote restored, so-called 'Redeemers' won public office and began to systematically undo most of the social and economic reforms. These were white, Southern Democrats who vowed to undo Reconstruction and restore the Old South. They passed voting restrictions and 'Black Codes' to suppress the rights and opportunities of African Americans at the state and local levels. Jim Crow laws made segregation legal. The Supreme Court supported these actions, generally saying that the 14th and 15th Amendments only applied at the federal level. And though the Radical Republicans had worked for nearly a decade to secure equal rights, the House of Representatives changed hands in 1874. Under Democratic leadership, government spending was cut and many Reconstruction programs were hurt or eliminated.

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    my hands hurt ;~;

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    but heres all the information you need, just scrunch them up a bit and you'll have your answer.

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I appreciate it ^_^

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    hope this all helps ^-^

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