A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

Diana.xL

  • one year ago

How did composers change the way they composed from the Classical era to the Romantic era?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. Diana.xL
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @breezymeetee

  2. Diana.xL
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @Phebe

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Classical--very trilly, and very many dance works. There were cadenzas but not too many solos. The theatres were smaller but gaining momentum. No electricity yet so nothing too loud and bangy. romantic--ensembles increased in size dramatically. Solos were HUGE!!!! Not so much the trills but definitely much longer pieces. Loud and bangy music was being produced. The piano was now in many ensembles and orchestras. Those music rules were being abandoned (tritones allowed), and our musical theory was well-established. Chordal changes were very apparent. It wasn't so much the I-IV-V chords but now 7ths, 9ths, 2nds, and full chords that went from I-ii-iii-V....change in structure! Plus, the ABA sonatas formed

  4. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.