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tmagloire1

  • one year ago

ap calc ab help please ! http://prntscr.com/8o63v0 http://prntscr.com/8o640n

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    f' is the line of the slope of f

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So on your first problem if you can find which line is positive when one is increasing and negative while the other is decreasing it's f'

  3. tmagloire1
    • one year ago
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    How can I find that without an equation?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You can look at how line A decreases on the interval -infinity to zero

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    and then you can see that line b is negative from -infinity to zero

  6. tmagloire1
    • one year ago
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    This problem is so confusing omg. Okay so is line B decreasing from .4- -infinit?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yeah something like that

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Really you just eyeball where one is negative and see if the other line is decreasing, and if the other is positive one is increasing

  9. tmagloire1
    • one year ago
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    I think line B is positive and increasing while line A is decreasing

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1444085317486:dw| you can see that the straight line is the derivative because where its positive the arch is increasing and where its negative its decreasing

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'd just tell you the answer but I think its kinda important to understand. Give me a sec

  12. tmagloire1
    • one year ago
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    ok thanks

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay so I marked where line B is increasing / decreasing

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  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You can see that line b is negative while a is decreasing

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    as well as positive while a is increasing

  16. tmagloire1
    • one year ago
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    Yep so that would mean that it's f normal right

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    since the derivative is the line of the slope we know b is the derivative

  18. tmagloire1
    • one year ago
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    Ohh ok

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Do you get it? A is decreasing so the slope is negative, the slope of the line is the derivative. Look for the line that is negative while decreasing

  20. tmagloire1
    • one year ago
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    Oh ok so you just find where it's decreasing and negative and if the slope is negative than it's the derivative

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yeah but it doesnt have to be decreasing AND negative, just decreasing.

  22. tmagloire1
    • one year ago
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    oh ok i understand thanks for going through the work to help me with that one

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Your next problem is about the definition of a derivative at a point which is defined by this http://archives.math.utk.edu/visual.calculus/2/definition.8/eq1.gif

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Basically the number you want to find (the point) is a. So since you're finding 2, a is equal to 2.

  25. tmagloire1
    • one year ago
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    So i would just try plugging them into the two definition of limit equations and see what comes out?

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Not really your thing would look like (f(2+h) - f(2))/h

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So for f(2+h) you plug (2+h) wherever you see x and f(2) where ever you see h for the 2nd part.

  28. tmagloire1
    • one year ago
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    wait what 2nd part are you referring to

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the - f(2)

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Do you understand how to plug everything in?

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You dont need to actually do it for this problem, but thats important because sometimes you do. Its kinda situational

  32. tmagloire1
    • one year ago
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    im not sure i understand how to plug them in

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Alright

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So I have (f(2+h) - f(2))/h My equation is x^2 + 3x + 1 f(2+h) would be (2+h)^2 + 3(2+h) + 1 f(2) would be 2^2 + 3(2) + 1 I now have ((2+h)^2 + 3(2+h) + 1 - 2^2 + 3(2) + 1)/h

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    actually more like ((2+h)^2 + 3(2+h) + 1 - (2)^2 + 3(2) + 1)/h

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So then you just do algebra and simplify to get answers

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    But you can tell this one is c because c has x -> 2 as the limit instead of h -> 0

  38. tmagloire1
    • one year ago
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    oh ok so you take ((2+h)^2 + 3(2+h) + 1 - (2)^2 + 3(2) + 1)/h and simplify to see if i get the other answers

  39. tmagloire1
    • one year ago
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    @swagmaster47 how can you tell the other answers are correct or not

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