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cassieforlife5

  • one year ago

Find limit as x approaches -1

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  1. cassieforlife5
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1444091846364:dw|

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    my guess is that for a first step, get rid of that compound fraction

  3. cassieforlife5
    • one year ago
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    okay could you help me with that?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    sure

  5. Zarkon
    • one year ago
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    im betting they want \(x\to 0\)

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    would make more sense

  7. cassieforlife5
    • one year ago
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    no it's as \[\lim_{x \rightarrow -1}\]

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    then without doing a ton of work, you can pretty much forget about a limit existing the denominator of \(\frac{1}{\sqrt{x+1}}\) goes to zero and the numerator does not, so you are not going to have a limit forget i mentioned the algebra, although that is usually a good first step

  9. cassieforlife5
    • one year ago
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    okay I thought the question was really weird so I put nonexistent as the limit before and just wanted to see if I had done something wrong. Thanks so much!!

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yw

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    btw i guess it is worth mentioning that the domain of this beast is \((-1,\infty)\) so you cannot take the limit in any case a limit is two sided and you cannot approach \(-1\) from the left

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok that is wrong, because the domain excludes zero as well

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    but the above is still true

  14. cassieforlife5
    • one year ago
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    yeah I graphed it and it stopped at -1 and only continued onto the right which is why I assumed it was nonexistent

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