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anonymous

  • one year ago

As far as I can tell the answer for all of them is dissolution but wanted to ask anyway just in case I was wrong and get a proper answer along with explanation. With reference to Table 4.2, suggest one method by which you might separate (a) K+ from Ag+, (b) Ba2+ from Pb2+, (c) NH4+ from Ca2+, and (d) Ba2+ from Cu2+. All cations are assumed to be in aqueous solution, and the common anion is the nitrate ion.

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Chart Attached here.

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  2. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    i think they want specific examples, for a) you could add a sulfate and selectively precipitate the Ag+ ion

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    sulfate?

  4. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    yeah

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @aarong example please

  6. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    of a sulfate? it can be any that isn't insoluble, like \(Li_2SO_4\)

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @aaronq but isn't Li already soluble and Ag insoluble?! Wouldn't the separate anyway especially since they both have a positive charge.

  8. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    sorry for the late reply, i'm not getting notifications. Li is soluble, yes, that's what we want. when you put Li2SO4 in water it will separate, the \(SO_4^{2-}\) ions will "capture" the Ag+ ions from solution and cause them to precipitate (by forming \(Ag_2SO_4\)). hence you will separate the Ag+ ions from the K^+ ions

  9. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    The K+ ions remain in solution and you can filter out the Ag2SO4 precitpiate

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @aaronq but wouldn't Ag already be separated from the solution especially since it is a solid form that is insoluble anyway and plus the atoms are positively charged they would repel each other.

  11. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    Ag is not always a solid. When they write Ag+ it means that it's aqueous (i.e. in solution, not solid). And that's not what mean by separated.

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