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clamin

  • one year ago

Explain why the Newton;s Laws are important to understand and why they are still studied. (this is for my essay so i think i need a long one)

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  1. Shikamaru11
    • one year ago
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    is it enough??????? Newton’s laws were not the first mathematical description of the universe. People have actually been using math to predict the movement of the planets since Claudius Ptolemaeus developed his model in the second century AD. This system was eventually replaced with the Copernican system and even later by Kepler’s laws. However, these systems all had numerous and/or arbitrary sets of rules. They worked, but made very little sense. Newton’s laws of motion (along with his law of universal gravitation, which gave the appropriate form of the force to use in the Second Law) were able to explain planetary motion with fewer concepts; furthermore, those same three laws applied to things on Earth as well. The importance of this cannot be overstated! Newton showed that the same laws govern celestial motion and terrestrial motion. For all of history until that point, people had believed that the heavens were so sacred that they constituted a totally different realm. Newton proved otherwise! Newton showed that the human brain was capable of understanding deep properties of the natural world! This accomplishment was totally unprecedented and it greatly influenced scientific and religious communities. Alexander Pope may have described it best: Nature and nature’s laws lay hid in night; God said “Let Newton be” and all was light. Newton’s Laws Are The Most Intuitive Physical Theory Other than Newton’s laws, physicists have quite a few ways to describe the universe. These include: Lagrangian mechanics Hamiltonian mechanics Quantum mechanics Field theories Special relativity General relativity String theory Most of these are more accurate and “correct” than Newton’s laws, but their accuracy comes at a price: they are far removed from the everyday experiences of most people. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics describe the world by “minimizing action,” quantum mechanics describes the world in terms of probabilities, and field theories (not surprisingly) describe the world using fields. Special relativity removes the special status given to time, and general relativity explains gravity using “spacetime curvature.” String theory is too complicated and weird to even begin to describe here. If all of this sounds abstract and confusing to you, you’re right! Newton’s laws, however, describe the world using forces. Everyone has pushed or pulled something at least once in their life. Even if the math gets too complicated, most people can intuitively understand concepts like force and mass. Newton’s laws consequently make for a great introduction to physics since they are conceptually easier to swallow.

  2. kraftkirby
    • one year ago
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    Do we really need any more explanation then the question itself (the answer is literally in the question)?! We all know that without Newton lots of scientific discoveries like the law of gravity or conservation of mass would not come into existence until far later in history. Newton worked at a university (can't remember which one since I watched the documentary a long time ago) and there was a dirt garden (with an apple tree in it) and he would sit under the tree and draw out equations and other sorts of ideas in his head in the dirt (university staff told people not to disturb him or his drawings) and because of this Newton is now a well remembered physicist.

  3. Shikamaru11
    • one year ago
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    but she asked and I put it @kraftkirby

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Newton’s laws were not the first mathematical description of the universe. People have actually been using math to predict the movement of the planets since Claudius Ptolemaeus developed his model in the second century AD. This system was eventually replaced with the Copernican system and even later by Kepler’s laws. However, these systems all had numerous and/or arbitrary sets of rules. They worked, but made very little sense. Newton’s laws of motion (along with his law of universal gravitation, which gave the appropriate form of the force to use in the Second Law) were able to explain planetary motion with fewer concepts; furthermore, those same three laws applied to things on Earth as well. The importance of this cannot be overstated! Newton showed that the same laws govern celestial motion and terrestrial motion. For all of history until that point, people had believed that the heavens were so sacred that they constituted a totally different realm. Newton proved otherwise! Newton showed that the human brain was capable of understanding deep properties of the natural world! This accomplishment was totally unprecedented and it greatly influenced scientific and religious communities. Alexander Pope may have described it best: Nature and nature’s laws lay hid in night; God said “Let Newton be” and all was light. Newton’s Laws Are The Most Intuitive Physical Theory Other than Newton’s laws, physicists have quite a few ways to describe the universe. These include: Lagrangian mechanics Hamiltonian mechanics Quantum mechanics Field theories Special relativity General relativity String theory Most of these are more accurate and “correct” than Newton’s laws, but their accuracy comes at a price: they are far removed from the everyday experiences of most people. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics describe the world by “minimizing action,” quantum mechanics describes the world in terms of probabilities, and field theories (not surprisingly) describe the world using fields. Special relativity removes the special status given to time, and general relativity explains gravity using “spacetime curvature.” String theory is too complicated and weird to even begin to describe here. If all of this sounds abstract and confusing to you, you’re right! Newton’s laws, however, describe the world using forces. Everyone has pushed or pulled something at least once in their life. Even if the math gets too complicated, most people can intuitively understand concepts like force and mass. Newton’s laws consequently make for a great introduction to physics since they are conceptually easier to swallow. 15 hours agoReport Abuse 12 kraftkirby Best Response Medals 0 Do we really need any more explanation then the question itself (the answer is literally in the question)?! We all know that without Newton lots of scientific discoveries like the law of gravity or conservation of mass would not come into existence until far later in history. Newton worked at a university (can't remember which one since I watched the documentary a long time ago) and there was a dirt garden (with an apple tree in it) and he would sit under the tree and draw out equations and other sorts of ideas in his head in the dirt (university staff told people not to disturb him or his drawings) and because of this Newton is now a well remembered physicist.

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