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anonymous

  • one year ago

I have a question about SO2 's Lewis structure... Can anyone help?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I know that the correct Lewis structure for SO2 is...|dw:1444203381092:dw|

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    But my question is that doesn't this structure make the centre atom (S) hypervalent (have an expanded octet) -- 'S' doesn't obey the octet rule in this structure because if you count the bond pair electrons and lone pairs around S, it sums up to 10 electrons!

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I've been told that this |dw:1444203681550:dw| is not the 'best' Lewis structure because it has a formal charge, but at least it follows the Octet rule.

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So, is not having formal charge the most important when it comes to drawing Lewis structures? Or am I missing something?

  5. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    No, the most important thing is completing the octates (as the name suggests) but in case of sulfur or other 3rd period elements 1st we see if the octate is complete, then we see if the formal charge is least. Since sulfur and other 3rd period elements have a vacant 3d orbital they can expand their octates, so if we can get a structure with less formal charge even if the octate is expanded its ok cz theoretically it will be more stable over all

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ohhh!! Well that makes sense now! So does that only apply to elements in the 3rd period?

  7. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    3rd period and beyond. Not to 1st and 2nd period because they can not expand their octates due to lack of vacant d orbitals.

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Hmmm, that makes complete sense! Gotcha! You just literally saved me! I've got a Chem midterm tomorrow and this was the only thing that had me confused and it was driving me nuts!! XD lol

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thanks SO much!!

  10. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Glad I could be useful c:

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Of course!! XD You were way more useful in 5 min than my prof was in 1 month xP haha

  12. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    That's because I am an Alien c:

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oooh perfect!! hahaha *thumbs up*

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