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stuck-help

  • one year ago

fill in the blank vocab geometry

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  1. stuck-help
    • one year ago
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    when a conditional and its converse are true, you write then as a single true statement called a(n) __________________________. A statement that you prove true is a(n) ____________________. The part of a conditional that follows ”if” is the _______________.

  2. stuck-help
    • one year ago
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    @TayTay23

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    1) Biconditional 2) True Statement 3) Hypothesis

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    have to disagree with @Taytay23 on 3) this is a conclusion..if.then satatement

  5. Shikamaru11
    • one year ago
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    when both are true or false the statement should be Converse isn't it??

  6. stuck-help
    • one year ago
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    conclusion is the part of a conditional that follows "then" @BPDlkeme234

  7. stuck-help
    • one year ago
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    last one the ___________ of a conditional switches the hypothesis and conclusion.

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Well, if you are predicting something (Hpothesis) you would typically use the word "If." A conclusion is the result of the hypothesis, so it would come after then.

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @stuck-help If you switch the hypothesis and conclusion, it would become a converse. The answer is converse.

  10. stuck-help
    • one year ago
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    thanks @TayTay23

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Shikamaru11 a good example of a converse is the theorem of pythagoras 1. In a right-angled triangle, Pythagoras states that when the hypotenuse is equal to the sum of the two squares of the other two sides. 2.Converse is: If the square of one side of a triangle is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides, then the triangle is a right triangle.

  12. Shikamaru11
    • one year ago
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    well thanks for the clarification @BPDlkeme234 Sir :)

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @TayTay23, I have major concers. The words, if ...then are used in logical proof. If starts with a proposition, and then ends with a conclusion.

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