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anonymous

  • one year ago

A volleyball is thrown up in the air with initial velocity of 8.2m/s. what is the maximum height reached?

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  1. zephyr141
    • one year ago
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    use the kinematic equations. looks like it's the same ball with the same initial velocity. so that means we can use the time we found in the last question to find the maximum height achieved. now remember that at it's highest point the final velocity in the y direction will be 0 so knowing that let's look at the kinematic equations again and pick the best equation that best fits this problem.

  2. zephyr141
    • one year ago
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    matter in fact we can use this one\[d=v_0t+\frac{1}{2}at^2\]

  3. zephyr141
    • one year ago
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    i think the time we found was 0.84 seconds.

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    well my teacher said not to use the same time for this cause it'll give me the wrong answer

  5. zephyr141
    • one year ago
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    are you sure? because the time isn't going to change if you solve for time for this equation. i just checked and the velocities are the same in both questions and since gravity isn't changing it has to be the same time.

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i didnt understand her reasoning but i think thats whats throwing me off.

  7. zephyr141
    • one year ago
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    ok lets leave time out then. use this equation. it doesn't need time.\[v^2=v_0^2+2ad\]

  8. zephyr141
    • one year ago
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    isolate d in the equation first.

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    alright

  10. zephyr141
    • one year ago
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    you should get \[d=\frac{v^2-v_0^2}{2a}\]and now just plug in your known values. v0=8.2 m/s v=0 a=-9.8

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay. so i got -8.2/ -19.6??

  12. zephyr141
    • one year ago
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    \[d=\frac{0-(8.2)^2}{-19.6}=\frac{-67.24}{-19.6}=3.4306m\] or 3.4 meters. which is the same if we used time. so i don't really know why your teacher told you not to use time. maybe to solve it using a different equation.

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh man i didnt square them. yah probably idk ill ask her about it, thanks! again lol

  14. zephyr141
    • one year ago
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    lol no problem.

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