Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
g(x)= 4^x+3 +2 Halp Halp :( will medal
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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zepdrix
  • zepdrix
\[\large\rm g(x)=4^{x+3}+2\]What do we have to do with this function? :o
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Graph it :( We have to pick 3 points but I chose 1 and got like 258
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
My graph only goes to 6... on the worksheet that is -_____-

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zepdrix
  • zepdrix
|dw:1444279384850:dw|It's an exponential, so it looks something like this :U
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
wait its not exponential?? lol ugh
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Oh you're picking points and stuff? :) Ok ok hmm
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Yeah I mean it would look like that though. I tried -1 and got 18 which is still a big number :(
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Ya, you don't want really big numbers. So you would like to make the `exponent` as close to zero as possible. So you want this x+3 to be somewhat small. How bout x=-3?
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
18 isn't big, simmer down :) lol
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Apparently for the graph it is lol
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
\(\large\rm (-3,?)\) what do you get for your y when plug in -3 for x?
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Okay for -3 = 6 :) much better
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Hmm that doesn't sound right.
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
No?
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
\[\large\rm g(-3)=4^{-3+3}+2\]\[\large\rm g(-3)=4^{0}+2\]4^0 is? :o
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Oh, its 1. Fantastic Ima fail this lol :/
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
\(\large\rm (-3,3)\) mmm ok good that gives us one point :) How about choosing another value that is really close by, like umm... -2?
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Okay :) Lemme do it
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
its 6!!!!
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
\(\large\rm (-2,6)\) Ahh there's that 6 :) lol
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
If x=-1 is giving you a value that is too big, then you could try going the other direction I suppose, x=-4
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
What if we do -4? Since -1 = 18 -___-
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Okay doing it now :)
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
it comes out at 2.25
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
\(\large\rm (-4,2.25)\) Yay good job \c:/
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Graph em.. connect the dots :p go .. do it
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Lol it looks kinda weird but I'll take it! It must be right.
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
What will be thr asymptote? :o
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
The normal asymptote for an exponential function will be the x-axis, which is y=0. The +2 on the end of our function is a vertical shift up 2 units. So hmm.. what will that do? :)
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Oh no, theres more?!?! :(
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
y=2.25?? @zepdrix
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Lol I knew you were gonna click on that other question, I clicked on it too. Great minds think alike :)
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
The +2 is shifting `everything` up by 2. So it shifts the asymptote up by 2. So instead of having an asymptote at y=0, you'll have an asymptote at y=2.
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Thank you, thank you!!!!!! Good luck helping that guy! <3 Youre awesome
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
:3

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