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anonymous

  • one year ago

Research building codes for ramps such as wheelchair ramps, boat ramps, or loading docks. Choose a building code for a ramp and describe the relationship between the lengths involved using geometry vocabulary such as hypotenuse, adjacent side, and opposite side. Use right triangle concepts from this unit to find any unknown lengths and angle measures of the ramp. Be sure to identify the type of ramp. Discuss why there are building codes for ramps and how you think they are determined.

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  1. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    First off, lets break this into parts. Research building codes for ramps such as wheelchair ramps, boat ramps, or loading docks.

  2. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    Which one of those ramps would you like to research?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I have the codes for wheel chair ramps. Wheelchair ramps: The ramp should be no steeper than one foot per inch of rise, rise should not exceed 30 inches, width must be at least 36 inches, and landings much be at least 60 square inches both at the top of the platform and in any directional transition. Handrails are required on ramps that rise more than 6 inches or any more than 72 inches long. Wheelchair ramps may be fabricated from any material, provided they do not allow water to accumulate and have enough tread to prevent slipping.

  4. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    Awesome! So the entire ramp should not be over 30 inches high. |dw:1444310730469:dw|

  5. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    How much do you think our rise should be?

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    If its 1 ft per inch of rise, it could be 30 ft.

  7. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    So you want the height to be 30 inches?

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I think lol

  9. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    Okay, so the height is 30 inches, and they have to have AT LEAST one foot of length per inch of height, which means at a minimum, we have a 30ft long ramp

  10. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1444311099329:dw|

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so since I have those two values, couldn't I solve to find the other value?

  12. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    Exactly!

  13. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    Do you know how to use sin, cos and tan?

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes I do, thank you so so sooooo much!

  15. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    No problem! Let me know what you come to as an answer for the hypotenuse :)

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    But I need an angle value...

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I know since I have the adjacent and opposite sides I would use tan

  18. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    Well, we know that opposite is 30 inches, and adjacent is 360 inches (30ft *12 inches). So what operation (sin, cos, tan) would we use to find angle A?|dw:1444311592484:dw|

  19. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    Yep, you're already ahead of me :)

  20. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    Do you know how to use inverse tan?

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    No, I don't

  22. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    Let me refresh on this really quickly

  23. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    Or call @freckles over because I'm confusing myself...

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    If I did this right it think it would be 85.2

  25. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    That sounds a lot more reasonable than what I'm getting...

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so if that's the measure of the angle, how would I go about solving it to find the hypotenuse? I've only dealt with one value being x when working with sin, cos, and tan.

  27. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    Okay, you have angle B, with that we can find angle A (4.8) |dw:1444312183349:dw|

  28. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    We have theta now, so we can plug that in, \(\tan(85.2)=\dfrac{30}{360}\)

  29. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    Wait

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    wouldn't I plug in 4.8

  31. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    yes yes yes, you can use sin(4.8)=x/30 or cos(4.8)x/360

  32. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    cos(4.8)=x/360

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[\tan 4.8=30/360\]

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay thank you so very much!

  35. sleepyjess
    • one year ago
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    No problem! Thank you for refreshing my memory on sin, cos and tan :)

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So I used cos and when I worked it out I got 368.56 would that be right?

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