A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

k_lynn

  • one year ago

Can someone explain Archimedes' Principle? My book keeps talking about buoyancy and I'm not understanding it.

  • This Question is Closed
  1. k_lynn
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    @sleepyhead314 @thomaster

  2. k_lynn
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    The part I'm really messed up on is this "The buoyant force exerted by a liquid is exactly equal to the weight of the liquid displaced." I'm unsure what displaced means.

  3. sleepyhead314
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    it is like how mass of water displaced = mass of stuff placed into water except this one results in being able to make an inference to the density of the object... I think... I didn't do so well in my physics class tho

  4. sleepyhead314
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    mmmm dis! https://upload.wikimedia.org/math/2/3/7/237bee86559c5c0d935068fd88c93d5d.png

  5. k_lynn
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ok. It makes a little bit more sense. I get that you put something in water and mass is lost. I just am really confused because I'm not sure what displaced means in that sense.

  6. sleepyhead314
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    like if you had a graduated cylinder, it would be how much the water rises

  7. k_lynn
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ohh. So I put a brick in a bath tub or something and measure the amount of water I put in before I put the brick in. Then once I do put the brick in I measure how much is in there now and subtract? That would be the amount of mass lost?

  8. sleepyhead314
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    more equations than that .-.

  9. k_lynn
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    in a general sense would that be right?

  10. sleepyhead314
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    the actions yes but you wouldn't magically get the mass lost by subtracting

  11. sleepyhead314
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    if you have a graduated cylinder half filled with water you make note of the mass/volume of water/height in relation to the cylinder you take note of the original mass of a marble convert that mass into Newtons you put the marble into the cylinder with the water make note of the increase in height calculate the volume of water that increased convert that to Newtons that would be the new Newtons of your marble subtract Original Newtons by new Newtons of the marble to find the lost mass

  12. k_lynn
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Ok. My book is going over this for specific gravity. And in order to find specific gravity, you have this formula- \[S.G=\frac{ mass~of~object }{mass~of~water~displaced~by~the~object }\] Right? If I know the mass of water displaced by the object, I can find Specific Gravity?

  13. sleepyhead314
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    not the right formula? http://study.com/cimages/multimages/16/specificgravityformula1.png

  14. sleepyhead314
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ohhh nvm I see what you're saying but it still should be (weight of object) / (weight of displaced fluid) note: weight and mass are different things

  15. k_lynn
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    okie. I think I get this now. Thanks so much for helping me!

  16. sleepyhead314
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    glad I could help ^_^

  17. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.