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jojokiw3

  • one year ago

When graphing this equation, where do I put this part of it?

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  1. jojokiw3
    • one year ago
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    \[y = 2+3 \sin [3(x-\frac{ \pi }{ 4 })]\] What do I do with the second 3?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @SoullessEyes

  3. jojokiw3
    • one year ago
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    @zepdrix

  4. jojokiw3
    • one year ago
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    So 2 is the center line, 3 is the amplitude, pi/4 is the phase angle. What's the 3 in front of the x?

  5. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Sounds right so far! :) \[\large\rm y=A \sin[B(x-C)]+D\]A gives us amplitude, B gives us period in this way \(\rm Period=2\pi/B\), C is our phase shift, D moves the center line,

  6. jojokiw3
    • one year ago
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    Oo, what's period?

  7. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    It's the amount of time it takes for the sine function to complete one full cycle. Or in this case it would maybe be more appropriate to say, the amount of x for sine to complete a full cycle, to get back to it's starting point.

  8. jojokiw3
    • one year ago
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    So is it like the "distance" from one high point to the next?

  9. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1444370686674:dw|

  10. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1444370742440:dw|A single period here

  11. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Yes, that's a good way to think of it!

  12. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Usually sine function starts at the mid point though, so measuring top to top might be a little weird

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @zepdrix when done can u help me?

  14. jojokiw3
    • one year ago
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    So for cosine it's maybe top to top, but sine it's mid to mid?

  15. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1444370812720:dw|This is one full period of the normal sine curve. So careful when you say mid to mid! :) We pass through the middle an extra time.

  16. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Notice that I've captured the entire shape with these red dots, One camel hump up, and one more down. Then it repeats that over and over.

  17. jojokiw3
    • one year ago
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    Haha oh you're right. So basically two curves, though one of the cos curves is cut in half.

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    nvm its 11pm i gtg

  19. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    ya cosine is a little weird. you're getting `half a camel hump`, then the entire lower one, then `another half of the upper one`.

  20. jojokiw3
    • one year ago
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    I think I get it now. :D Thanks for explaining!

  21. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    yay team \c:/

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