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marcelie

  • one year ago

help please how do i find the multiplicity and zeros. i attached a picture.

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  1. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    Find all zeros of the following polynomial functions, noting multiplicities. f (x) = 2x^6 − 6x^5 + 18x^4

  2. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    Have you tried factoring the given polynomial ?

  3. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    yes. hold on let me take pic of it .

  4. marcelie
    • one year ago
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  5. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Oo I like that pen, what is that?

  6. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    Very good! so far, you have figured out that "0" is a zero with a multiplicity of "4"

  7. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    yes. so im having trouble doing the other one so do i do the quadratic formula ? bc its going to give me i

  8. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    ofcourse yes, quadratic formula is always there for quadratic polynomials, use it..

  9. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    okay one sec.

  10. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    but wait a moment, you could also tell a lot about zeroes from the sign of discriminant

  11. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    Look at only the quadratic polynomial : \(x^2-3x+9\) whats the value of its discriminant ?

  12. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1444371566488:dw|

  13. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1444371609598:dw|

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    this is easy if you know how to use synthetic division after you find a factor of the equation. Just giving you a side note :)

  15. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    oh.

  16. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    discriminant is just -27, what does that tell you about the roots ?

  17. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    its can be +/- ?

  18. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    can synthetic be possible too ?

  19. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    yes

  20. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    negative discriminant tells you that the roots are not real

  21. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    bc for the 2nd equation i got i's

  22. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    lordie... im confuse

  23. Directrix
    • one year ago
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    I'm thinking: 0 is a root of multiplicity 4 3/2 - ( (3i * sqrt(3) ) /2 is a root of multiplicity 1 3/2 + ( (3i * sqrt(3) ) /2 is a root of multiplicity 1

  24. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    yes.

  25. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    but my solution book says 3 with multiplicity of 2

  26. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    sumone please help me .. im so lost DX

  27. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    If 3 multiplicity of 2, then the original equation should have been \(\large\rm 2x^6-\color{red}{12}x^5+18x^4\) Are you sure you wrote it down correctly? :o

  28. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    yes. :( let me show you the problem. please dont leave me hanging lol

  29. marcelie
    • one year ago
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  30. marcelie
    • one year ago
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  31. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    so idk .. if i factored out wrong or the paper is wrong

  32. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    ya your work looks fine :o https://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=roots+of+2x%5E6-6x%5E5%2B18x%5E4 wolfram confirms the roots also.

  33. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    I think you're doing something silly, like not looking at the correct answer key or something >.>

  34. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    z. lol answer is 0 with multiplicity 4, 3 with multiplicity 2

  35. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    how the hell they get 3 wit multi 4 ?

  36. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    3 with multiplicity 2? I dunno, they're being silly billies. Books make mistakes sometimes.

  37. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    true.. i hate this online book

  38. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    so how do i graph it since i have i 's

  39. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    second equation gives me - as answer so that cant b taken its a neg right ?

  40. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    oh you have to graph it now? :o interesting

  41. Directrix
    • one year ago
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    @zepdrix posted the graph as part of the Wolfram work https://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=roots+of+2x^6-6x^5%2B18x^4 It looks like a flat nose parabola but the graph is not a parabola. More of a U-shape.

  42. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    i think so lol

  43. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    so yall think my book is wrong

  44. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    ya, definitely :o they made a typo in the function, it shoulda been 12 on the x^5. It looks like they wanted you to determine the multiplicity based on the graph, not based on factoring, isn't that what it says? :D so maybe use a graphing calculator?

  45. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    hmmm

  46. Directrix
    • one year ago
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    Yes, I do. E-mail the teacher to discuss it. You should not lose points because of someone's typo and lack of proof reading skills.

  47. marcelie
    • one year ago
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    hmm

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