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nuccioreggie

  • one year ago

Triangle PQR is transformed to triangle P'Q'R'. Triangle PQR has vertices P(3, −6), Q(0, 9), and R(−3, 0). Triangle P'Q'R' has vertices P'(1, −2), Q'(0, 3), and R'(−1, 0). Plot triangles PQR and P'Q'R' on your own coordinate grid. Part A: What is the scale factor of the dilation that transforms triangle PQR to triangle P'Q'R'? Explain your answer. (4 points) Part B: Write the coordinates of triangle P"Q"R" obtained after P'Q'R' is reflected about the y-axis. (4 points) Part C: Are the two triangles PQR and P''Q''R'' congruent? Explain your answer. (2 points)

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  1. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    @chris00 thanks I won't be able to complete pressed for time

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1444396883679:dw|

  3. nuccioreggie
    • one year ago
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    ok

  4. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    did you plot the points?

  5. nuccioreggie
    • one year ago
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    yes

  6. nuccioreggie
    • one year ago
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    can you guys explain all the answers for me please

  7. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    to reflect across the y-axis each point (x, y) goes to (-x, y)

  8. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    congruent means same compare the lengths and angles

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    do you know how to calculate scale factors @nuccioreggie

  10. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    scale factor is the ratio of the sides from

  11. nuccioreggie
    • one year ago
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    no

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    you can pick any point to determine the scale factor

  13. nuccioreggie
    • one year ago
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    ok

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    scale factor = new image/ old image

  15. nuccioreggie
    • one year ago
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    So for Part A?

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    P'(1, −2) (new image) old image P(3, −6))

  17. nuccioreggie
    • one year ago
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    um uhhh i sthat for part A?

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    you can choose the x or y-coordindate to solve for it

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    scale factor = 1/3

  20. nuccioreggie
    • one year ago
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    ok can you explain the answer for part A in 1 comment please

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i just did...

  22. nuccioreggie
    • one year ago
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    ohhhh lol im so sorrry so scale factor = 1/3 is the answer

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    a) scale factor = new image/old image Pick a point, so P. P is the old image. P' is the new image. to determine the scale factor we can either use the corresponding x co-ordinate or y-coorindates. using the co-ordinates P'(1, −2) (new image) old image P(3, −6)) therefore using x co-orindate scale factor = P'/P = 1/3 or using y co-orindate scale factor = P'/P = -2/-6=1/3 therefore scale factor = 1/3 we can see this seems right because the new image is smaller than the old image

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    good?

  25. nuccioreggie
    • one year ago
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    wow lol yea thanks so what about B and C?

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yep ok

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    if we want to reflect it in the y axis, |dw:1444397999471:dw|

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    as triciall said each point (x, y) goes to (-x, y)

  29. nuccioreggie
    • one year ago
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    oh ok so what will the answer for letter B will be?

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Triangle P'Q'R' has vertices P'(1, −2), Q'(0, 3), and R'(−1, 0). Therefore, P"Q"R" have verticies P''(-1,-2) Q'' (0,3) R''(1,0)

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1444398231371:dw|

  32. nuccioreggie
    • one year ago
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    ok soooo i get that the answer for C?

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    B) since y-reflection means each point (x, y) goes to (-x, y) Therefore, Triangle P'Q'R' has vertices P'(1, −2), Q'(0, 3), and R'(−1, 0). Therefore, P"Q"R" have verticies P''(-1,-2) Q'' (0,3) R''(1,0)

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the diagram is used for C

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1444398545805:dw|

  36. nuccioreggie
    • one year ago
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    CAN YOU PUT THE ANSWER FOR c in word please?

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    C) Triangles are congruent when they have exactly the same three sides and exactly the same three angles So no triangles PQR and P''Q''R'' are not congruent

  38. nuccioreggie
    • one year ago
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    thank you

  39. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    np

  40. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i think i get a fan after that ahah

  41. nuccioreggie
    • one year ago
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    can you help me with like 2more questions?

  42. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    sorry, i have to go to sleep. its past midnight >.<

  43. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    good luck

  44. nuccioreggie
    • one year ago
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    preciate it

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