A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • one year ago

A box has 60 balls, of which 22 are red, 19 are blue, and 19 are yellow, as before. Balls are extracted at random but this time not returned to the box. What is the probability that after performing this test three times exactly two are blue and one is red?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    when i do the calculation i got the answer 1818/17110 but the book answer have 5643/17110, i think i did something wrong my calculation

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    this what i did to get the calculation \[\frac{ \left(\begin{matrix}19 \\ 2\end{matrix}\right)* \left(\begin{matrix}22 \\ 1\end{matrix}\right)*\left(\begin{matrix}19 \\ 0\end{matrix}\right)}{ \left(\begin{matrix}60 \\ 3\end{matrix}\right)}\]

  3. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    what is the test being performed?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    combination

  5. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    What is the probability that after performing ***this test*** three times exactly two are blue and one is red? the questions feels like its missing information ... prolly from a different question?

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    k A box has 50 balls, of which 16 are red, 19 are blue, and 15 are yellow. Balls are extracted at random then returned to the box. What is the probability that after performing this test three times exactly two are yellow and one is blue?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    similar but a bit different w/ a number

  8. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    experiment ... might be a better word

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i see

  10. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    A box has 60 balls, of which 22 are red, 19 are blue, and 19 are yellow, as before. Balls are extracted at random but this time not returned to the box. What is the probability that after performing this (process) three times exactly two are blue and one is red? rbb brb bbr 3*(22.19.18)/(60.59.58) maybe?

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    doing that the number will be large

  12. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    1881/17110 is what that turns out to be

  13. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    P(bbr) or P(brb) or P(rbb) are the only ways we can pull 2bs and 1r in 3 pulls right?

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    correct

  15. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    and after we pull them out the remaining amounts decrease by 1 22 for red, 19 and 18 for blues and the ball count reduces 60,59,58 for the product of the denominator ...

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    is like this |dw:1444575916412:dw|

  17. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    not factorial, 3 * (22 P 1) * (19 P 2) ------------------- (60 P 3)

  18. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    but my solution is even less than yours, so i might not have a grasp of the information

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i wonder what is p1 and p2 p3 use for ?

  20. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    nPk is the permuations of n objects, k times it is used when the order matters abc not equal bac nCk is the combinations of n objects, k times it is used when the order doesnt matter abc = bac k! nCk = nPk

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    we are using the permutation instead of combination

  22. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    yes, or at least as a basis for a model

  23. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    there are 3 ways to pull bbr and each pull has a probability of (22*19*18)/(60*50*58)

  24. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    this is assuming it means that we are pulling 3 balls starting at the first pull.

  25. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    59, not 50 ... my fingers hate me

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    k i see the answer |dw:1444576774278:dw|

  27. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    1881 is what i get for a numerator 5643 is what your book gives, which is 3 times bigger than my outcome. 3*3*(...) where are they coming up with 9 different ways to order it?

  28. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    what does "this test" refer to?

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i have 3*(7524/205320)

  30. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    which reduces yes

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    as you said the experiment

  32. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    that was my assumption, but my outcome differs from the books outcome. someones got to be wrong, and I assume its me :)

  33. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    are you looking at the correct solution?

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes im

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    just said about the multi-step process

  36. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    even your approach gets the same results as me

    1 Attachment
  37. TuringTest
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I get the same answer as you guys. I am suspicious of the book's answer.

  38. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    could it be possible that we are drawing more than 3 of them out for our sample space?

  39. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    here the answer but do not show the step

    1 Attachment
  40. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    3*(15*15*19)/(60*60*60) = 513/5000 so its the same approach

  41. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    the book solution is wrong then

  42. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thank you so much for the correcting the confusion

  43. amistre64
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    im trying to see how they could have gotten an answer 3 times bigger, but other than a simpler human error in inputing it to begin with i cant duplicate it.

  44. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    k

  45. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.