anonymous
  • anonymous
How do you calculate weight from density?
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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mathmate
  • mathmate
weight = volume \(\times\) density but do make sure that they are in consistent units.
anonymous
  • anonymous
thanks!
mathmate
  • mathmate
You're welcome! :)

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Weight = force x acceleration. So, first know what density is... density = mass / volume. Now, we know that mass = density * volume. The important factor is gravity. So the final solution is, weight (mass*gravity) = density*volume. What mathmate gave was the mass, not the weight. Cheers.
mathmate
  • mathmate
@beapilot1 What you buy at the supermarket is mass too! lol What's important is the unit of the density, is it 2.7 g/mL, or 62.4 lb/cu.ft.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@mathmate if you worked in an engineering firm and you need to know the mass, mathmate decides to give the answer in mass under the weight definition. If this is an emergency life saving situation, in most cases engineering could be life/death, you actually gave a weight answer that is much smaller than required (because you gave it in mass) and could cause deaths. It's important to stick with what the request is... mass and weight are completely different things. Laugh all you want, but you won't when you realize you killed someone.
mathmate
  • mathmate
@beapilot1 There is a big difference between mass and weight density. It's all in the unit. That is why I mentioned that it is important to work with consistent units in my first response. In the super market, $2 per pound is pound weight. 1 g/cc is a mass density, the result is in mass. 62.4 lb/cu.ft is a weight density, the result is in weight. In engineering practice a pound mass is called a poundal. This means that the result all depends on the given density unit, and there is nothing wrong with the formula. In the mathematics section, students are learning the basic density formulas, and in general they have no notion of "g". I decide not to confuse their fragile concepts by introducing something they have not learned. If the question were in the Engineering or physics section, that's the place to explain the notion. I congratulate you for being conscious of the difference between mass and weight, and even more so about the importance of public safety. The latter plays a prominent part in the code of ethics of an engineer. I am sure you will eventually make a very successful engineering career, and society will be lucky to have you.

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