anonymous
  • anonymous
Jane Eyre Help
Literature
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
Which best describes the climax of the novel? A. Jane learns that Mr. Rochester was blinded and lost his hand while trying to save Bertha Mason's life. B. Mr. Rochester partially recovers his sight and is able to see his son. C. Jane believes she hears Mr. Rochester calling her while she is living at Moor House. D. Jane discovers that Mr. Rochester is married to Bertha Mason.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Climax is where the conflict of the plot is solved. For an example: when the prince saves the princess or when ever a villian plans is stopped.
Jadedry
  • Jadedry
The definition of climax varies. (Taken from thefreedictionary.com) 3. a. A moment of great or culminating intensity in a narrative or drama, especially the conclusion of a crisis. b. The turning point in a plot or dramatic action. A. Jane learns that Mr. Rochester was blinded and lost his hand while trying to save Bertha Mason's life. Not really applicable. If you read the book, the context is rather "soft", it's not meant to be a sudden development as much as a consequence. B. Mr. Rochester partially recovers his sight and is able to see his son. Again, "soft" context, the way this part is written is not climatic. C. Jane believes she hears Mr. Rochester calling her while she is living at Moor House This just reflects Jane's regret and sorrow, not a climax. D. Jane discovers that Mr. Rochester is married to Bertha Mason. Jane is about to get married when she discovers Rochester's terrible secret. It's a turning point that dramatically changes the "flow" and plot of the book. This is the climax.

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