anonymous
  • anonymous
What is the significance of Lennie, Candy, and Crooks' names in the novel "Of Mice and Men" ? ? I'll fan and medal.
English
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
a story that uses character types to represent specific ideas and create a universal message. In Of Mice and Men, Steinbeck uses his characters, locations, animal imagery, and a simple game of cards to demonstrate to his readers that most people dream about lives of great significance. But in reality, most humans’ limitations keep these dreams from coming true, and in the long run, they are destined to experience common lives
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yeah...I Just need the significance of their names lol
anonymous
  • anonymous
Lennie, with his mental handicap, can intuitively feel that the bunkhouse is not a good place. After meeting Curley, Lennie tells George, “I don’t like this place, George. This ain’t no good place. I wanna get outa here.” And as soon as Curley’s wife comes alone to the bunkhouse, George knows exactly where the trouble is going to originate. He cautions Lennie not to talk to Curley’s wife and to stay away from Curley. It is also in the bunkhouse that we see discrimination (against Candy and Crooks), cruelty (Curley’s wife’s attack on Crooks and Curley’s attack on Lennie), insensitivity (Carlson’s killing Candy’s dog), and suspicion (Curley’s jealousy, several characters presumptions about why Lennie and George are traveling together). This is also a world in which fate often plays a hand, and the humans are frequently defenseless and see their “best laid plans” go awry.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.