caozeyuan
  • caozeyuan
How can Br2 adds to alkene in syn > @Photon336@Zale101
Chemistry
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chestercat
  • chestercat
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
caozeyuan
  • caozeyuan
@Zale101
caozeyuan
  • caozeyuan
Does this website help? http://chemistry.umeche.maine.edu/CHY251/Br2Add.html
Photon336
  • Photon336
Yeah it does but we need to break what they are saying down step by step.

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Zale101
  • Zale101
|dw:1446771430777:dw|
Zale101
  • Zale101
This is an example of halogenation di halo alkene usually undergoes B2 and Cl2 I have to go now, gotta go home :)
Photon336
  • Photon336
yeah formation of that brominuim ion would imply anti i'm guessing..i'm a bit confused myself because the nucleophile would need to come in from the opposite side.
Photon336
  • Photon336
@caozeyuan read this and tell me what you think this was the site that I read before http://www.masterorganicchemistry.com/2013/03/06/bromination-of-alkenes-how-does-it-work/
caozeyuan
  • caozeyuan
Ok, it does not mention a different mechanism from the bromonium one
caozeyuan
  • caozeyuan
So I would assume the formation of two wedges and enantiomer is still the result of the bromonium mechanism
Photon336
  • Photon336
Yeah, but my OPINION is that the stereoselectivity has something to do with it as well as whether the alkene was cis or trans
Photon336
  • Photon336
This was the idea that I was advocating for earlier, what are your thoughts?
caozeyuan
  • caozeyuan
Yes, that is definitely true, but how does an SS and RR isomer form if it is always back side attack
Photon336
  • Photon336
That's where my understanding is failing
Empty
  • Empty
I think it's a good idea to look at the intermediates of the bromoniums to see why we get what we get. |dw:1446776644667:dw| Until this cute little bromine reacts, it's completely symmetrical. And if it could somehow by magic react at both places, it'd remain symmetrical. However, it can only react at one place, so it breaks the symmetry. In a sense, this symmetry is retained because you still have a 50-50 chance of one side or the other, so that's why you have a racemic mixture.
Empty
  • Empty
|dw:1446776863802:dw||dw:1446776883134:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Empty help me ):

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