anonymous
  • anonymous
Can someone help with some chemistry?
Chemistry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
http://cvms.canfield.k12.oh.us/homepages/data/canf_cc/files/ap_092313.pdf Can someone help with 3 the first one on the page with the red, blue, and purple circles?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@ganeshie8
anonymous
  • anonymous
@BAdhi

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anonymous
  • anonymous
@Data_LG2
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Hero
anonymous
  • anonymous
Is the link working for you
Photon336
  • Photon336
The question that says: 2A + B --> C right? If so.. what is your interpretation of this equation?
Photon336
  • Photon336
and secondly, do you know what the limiting reagent is?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I thought it would be D because I think you have 8 of A and 5 of B. So B is your limiting.
anonymous
  • anonymous
So the most you could make is 5
anonymous
  • anonymous
And you would have 3 red/A left over?
Photon336
  • Photon336
Think about this again: in this chemical reaction you need 2 molecules of A for every molecule of B. can you see why?
Photon336
  • Photon336
Let's count them up We have 8 atoms A Red and 5 atoms of B blue right?3
anonymous
  • anonymous
Right
Photon336
  • Photon336
the chemical reaction says that 2 molecules of A react for every molecule of B
anonymous
  • anonymous
You wouldn't multiply the 8 by 2 right and get 16?
Photon336
  • Photon336
let's go back first, we know that one of the reactants is going to run out first. 8 atoms of A and 5 atoms of B. 2A + B --> C i'm pretty sure that we need 10 atoms of A to react with 5 atoms of B. but we only have 8 atoms of A reacting with 5 atoms of B. so A will be the limiting reactant and we will be left with 1 atom of B left over BLUE.
anonymous
  • anonymous
How exactly did you figure that out?
Photon336
  • Photon336
|dw:1446862421900:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay so it would be c?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I got confused about how much product we get in the end.
Photon336
  • Photon336
So looking at the reaction above, can you tell me how many molecules of each react and why? just by looking at the balanced reaction.
Photon336
  • Photon336
we will work on this step by step
anonymous
  • anonymous
2A is need for 1B to make C
Photon336
  • Photon336
yes.
Photon336
  • Photon336
so essentially this is telling us that we need twice the amount of A in order to react with B? make sense?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes
Photon336
  • Photon336
let's move on
anonymous
  • anonymous
So in a sense would you have to divide the A by 2?
Photon336
  • Photon336
@staldk3 we will do this step by step and you'll get it Now they gave us 8 molecules of A and 5 molecules of B.
Photon336
  • Photon336
we can do two things
Photon336
  • Photon336
First we can multiply the number of molecules by the molar ratio. do you notice that the unit we're not looking for is in the denominator and cancels out. |dw:1446862767089:dw| now we do this We make a table. We write down how many molecules we started off with for each, and how many we need if the reaction is to go to completion if there weren't any listing reagents. we then find that we need 10 molecules of A but only have 8, while we only need 4 molecules of B and have 5. That's why we have one molecule of b left over and all the A is gone. |dw:1446862891128:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
Rather do the mole ratio one. I've never done it the second way before I don't think.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay. So we would have 4 purple and 1 blue?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think that's right.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Photon336
Photon336
  • Photon336
yeah so why do you think you would get four purple that's for C the product.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Because it's limited by the limited reactant. You can only make as much as the limited reactant has.
Photon336
  • Photon336
that's correct @staldk3 but just remember yo can always check by doing this
Photon336
  • Photon336
|dw:1446864008309:dw|
Photon336
  • Photon336
always get into the habit of doing that whenever you have these questions multiplying by the molar ratio, ensuring that the number of moles you want for a certain reactant is in the numerator and the one you're multiplying the ratio by is in the denominator.
Photon336
  • Photon336
You always need to find out what reactant runs out FIRST that's why limiting reagents are so important
anonymous
  • anonymous
Right. Thanks for helping. I have another one like this. I'll see if I can do it. This one is a bit harder.
Photon336
  • Photon336
Make sure your equations are balanced first then. Use the molar ratios to figure how much of each reactant you need. Then make a chart like I did above and compare.
anonymous
  • anonymous
2CO + O2 -->2CO2

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