MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
can someone help me writing a diary prompts??
Writing
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
chestercat
  • chestercat
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
@SeaRocks77
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
ok so they want me to write a diary prompts on a main character like I have to tell about the main character actions in my own words
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
@SeaRocks77 can you plz help me

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
What is the story u have to write about the main character?
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
hamlet
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
the first point is Horatio's response to seeing the ghost for the first time.
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
So in this scanario I am be the Horatio right??
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
When I see the ghost first time then I initially assumes that the ghost appearance must mean that there is something wrong with the current government, “this bodes some strange eruption to our state", and that the appearance is foreshadowing some ominous event that will soon occur. I get more shock when I see the ghost exactly looking like the old king then I try to talk with the ghost but it’s disappear. Little later, the ghost of Old Hamlet appears once more. This time I again try to speak to the ghost. But when the ghost remains silent, I tells Marcellus and Bernardo to try to detain it; they strike at the ghost with their spears but jab only air. A rooster crows just as the ghost appears ready to reply to reply me at last. This sound startles the ghost away. But then I decide to tell Prince Hamlet, Old Hamlet’s son, about the apparition, and the others agree.
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
this is what i wrote
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ok thats good
anonymous
  • anonymous
Do you want me to rewrite it or help u write a better one ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
?
anonymous
  • anonymous
hello..
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
yeah
anonymous
  • anonymous
So I think A university student whose studies are interrupted by his father’s death, Hamlet is extremely philosophical and contemplative. He is particularly drawn to difficult questions or questions that cannot be answered with any certainty. Faced with evidence that his uncle murdered his father, evidence that any other character in a play would believe, Hamlet becomes obsessed with proving his uncle’s guilt before trying to act. The standard of “beyond a reasonable doubt” is simply unacceptable to him. He is equally plagued with questions about the afterlife, about the wisdom of suicide, about what happens to bodies after they die—the list is extensive. But even though he is thoughtful to the point of obsession, Hamlet also behaves rashly and impulsively. When he does act, it is with surprising swiftness and little or no premeditation, as when he stabs Polonius through a curtain without even checking to see who he is. He seems to step very easily into the role of a madman, behaving erratically and upsetting the other characters with his wild speech and pointed innuendos. It is also important to note that Hamlet is extremely melancholy and discontented with the state of affairs in Denmark and in his own family—indeed, in the world at large. He is extremely disappointed with his mother for marrying his uncle so quickly, and he repudiates Ophelia, a woman he once claimed to love, in the harshest terms. His words often indicate his disgust with and distrust of women in general. At a number of points in the play, he contemplates his own death and even the option of suicide. But, despite all of the things with which Hamlet professes dissatisfaction, it is remarkable that the prince and heir apparent of Denmark should think about these problems only in personal and philosophical terms. He spends relatively little time thinking about the threats to Denmark’s national security from without or the threats to its stability from within (some of which he helps to create through his own carelessness).
anonymous
  • anonymous
is that good so far?
anonymous
  • anonymous
? hello..
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
lol where you get this all from
anonymous
  • anonymous
My self and a site i read this book before so
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
i guess you don't understand my question
anonymous
  • anonymous
what do you mean..
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
the given point is on the Horatio's but you are talking about hamlet is your paragraph
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
the given point is Horatio's response to seeing the ghost for the first time.
anonymous
  • anonymous
ohhh i thought u wanted it on hamlet
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
from this he have to believe that i am horatio
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
we
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
and then we have to talk about his actions in our own words
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
so in this cause I am be the Horatio
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok so u want it on Horatio
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
yeah but nevermind
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh ok :(
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
just help me with this one Ophelia on her feelings toward and Hamlet, and her reaction to her brother and father's counsel.
anonymous
  • anonymous
u want a sumnarry of that?
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
summary of what
anonymous
  • anonymous
The feelings ophelia has toward Hamlet
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
At first ophelia loved Hamlet.But Hamlet losses his feelings towards ophelia
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
@wildQueen
anonymous
  • anonymous
nfortunately for Ophelia, Laertes on departing, reminded her of his counsel in the presence of her father. His words sufficed to rouse the old courtier's prying instinct. Over-mastered by curiosity, he insists on knowing the import of his son's advice. He approves the judgment of Laertes, and goes even further, by condemning her for being too free and bounteous of her time with the Prince, and for not understanding what behooves his daughter and her honor. His severe arraignment, while chargeable to solicitude, most commendable in a father, was due more to the low estimate which he entertained of Hamlet's honor and his motives. Like Laertes he could not imagine that the Prince was truly and genuinely in love with Ophelia; because, not being intimately acquainted with him, he knew neither his nobility of character nor his refined moral nature, and, therefore, measured him according to his own low standard. Learning of the cause of Hamlet's frequent visits, Polonius in excitement catechises his daughter. His impassioned words "extort from her in short sentences, uttered with a bashful reluctance, the confession of Hamlet's love for her, but not a word of her own love for him. The whole scene is managed with inexpressible delicacy; it is one of those instances common in Shakespeare in which we are allowed to perceive what is passing in the mind of a person without any consciousness on their part. Only Ophelia herself is unaware that while she is admitting the extent of Hamlet's courtship, she is also betraying how deep an impression it has made, and how entire is the love with which it is returned." [Mrs. Jameson] Her father's earnestness had impelled her to speak in self-defense; but her attempt to correct his false notions concerning the nature of Hamlet's love, instead of allaying, only irritated more the old chancellor, who, always infallible in his judgments, could neither brook contradiction, nor tolerate any hesitating acceptance of his oracles. Poor Ophelia, bewildered by his onslaught, knows neither what to say nor think. He will teach her: she must consider herself an inexperienced girl, and not accept Hamlet's words of love as legal tenders of sterling silver, when they are naught but counterfeit; she must look upon his "holy vows" as snares to entrap simpletons who have no more circumspection than a senseless woodwingspan. Appealing to his own experience, he assures her that love is prodigal of vows, which scarce survive their making. She must, therefore, not believe the Prince's vows, which are brokers, clothed in pious form the better to deceive. In conclusion, he forbids her, henceforth, to meet and speak more with the Lord Hamlet. Her father's words confirming those of Laertes, and blasting even worse the fair name of her lover, make him nothing less than a deceiver and seducer. They affect Ophelia's heart most painfully; for in her ignorance and inexperience she has the greatest confidence in the wisdom of her father and her brother, and, therefore, feels inclined, against her own good judgment, to distrust her lover. This disloyalty reveals a weakness of character, which shall later lead her into other fatal errors. Without making further defense, Ophelia bows in silence, and with filial respect utters the laconic reply, "I shall obey, my lord." Amid conflicting doubts and in painful heart, she accepts the command to break off her relations with Hamlet; in fact, "to lock herself from his resort, to admit no messengers, and receive no tokens." In this scene, in which for the first time we are introduced to the old courtier, the dramatist evidently intends to lay the foundation for Hamlet's fixed judgment that he is "a foolish prating knave." Notwithstanding his boasted keenness of perception and ambition to play the wily diplomat, Polonius discloses invariably on every occasion his fatal weakness of stumbling upon the wrong scent, and of blunderingly pursuing it with an obstinacy that leads to his own final ruin. How to
anonymous
  • anonymous
there ya go
anonymous
  • anonymous
good job @SeaRocks77
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thank u
anonymous
  • anonymous
it has been a long time since i read that book
anonymous
  • anonymous
but what is wrong with one you did
anonymous
  • anonymous
huh?
anonymous
  • anonymous
lol im talking about @MTALHAHASSAN2
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh ok lol..
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1446884986003:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
@MTALHAHASSAN2
anonymous
  • anonymous
@MTALHAHASSAN2 why wont u answer @WildQueen? She asked why you're summary wasn't good enough
MTALHAHASSAN2
  • MTALHAHASSAN2
I already answer
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh ok..
anonymous
  • anonymous
the third one is Ophelia on her feelings toward and Hamlet, and her reaction to her brother and father's counsel. That is what he said to me
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
In Act 2, scene 1, Ophelia tells her father, Polonius, that she fears Hamlet is "mad" for her love. She describes how a distressed Hamlet came into her room, grabbed her by the wrist, backed away and just looked into her face, studying it before he slowly backed out of the room without looking back at the door. In Act 2, scene 2, Polonius tells Claudius and Gertrude that Hamlet is love-sick for Ophelia and cites a letter Hamlet wrote in which he calls Ophelia, "...the heavenly idol of my soul..." and a poem in which he says that he loves her. In Act 3, scene 1, Ophelia returns to Hamlet some letters and presents he wrote to her in which he professed his love for her. Finally, in Act 5, scene 1, Hamlet jumps into Ophelia's open grave and professes to Laertes and the others that he loved Ophelia more than 40,000 brothers. So, yes, I do believe Hamlet loved Ophelia.
anonymous
  • anonymous
this is what i did before
anonymous
  • anonymous
tell me if it helps u or i can find my other papers of this

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.