Zale101
  • Zale101
I'm just practicing Organic chemistry. Feel free to join.
Chemistry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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chestercat
  • chestercat
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
Zale101
  • Zale101
|dw:1447019549998:dw|
Zale101
  • Zale101
|dw:1447019677144:dw|
Zale101
  • Zale101
|dw:1447019784308:dw|

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Zale101
  • Zale101
|dw:1447020343749:dw|
Zale101
  • Zale101
How would water be used in this reaction?
Photon336
  • Photon336
Well that above the water is competes with bromine
Zale101
  • Zale101
|dw:1447021070155:dw|
Zale101
  • Zale101
If H2O is present as the solvent, then it would be halohydrin. No solvent, just br2 alone then it's a halogenation
Photon336
  • Photon336
On the phone app, I can't see what you wrote I will take a look.
Zale101
  • Zale101
Okay :)
Zale101
  • Zale101
@abb0t did i do this right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
what is this?
abb0t
  • abb0t
Yes I am.
abb0t
  • abb0t
And yes, this is right. But...
abb0t
  • abb0t
With bromination, you can have enantiomers.
Zale101
  • Zale101
Oh yes i do. But is it right besides the racemic stuff?
abb0t
  • abb0t
Yes.
abb0t
  • abb0t
SeaRocks, why are ou interrupting?!!?
Zale101
  • Zale101
Thanks abb0t
Zale101
  • Zale101
|dw:1447028935702:dw|
Photon336
  • Photon336
|dw:1447034813519:dw|
Zale101
  • Zale101
^That's the correct way.
Photon336
  • Photon336
i guess the question you could ask yourself is why does water compete with bromine
Photon336
  • Photon336
I think water attacks the less hindered side, from the opposite side.
Zale101
  • Zale101
Actually, i was confused because i did the mechanism for Br2 only without the solvent. When i did that, there was no space for H2O to take place. I should've did the other mechanism where Br2 and H2O both takes place.
Photon336
  • Photon336
Yeah if you use just Br2 or maybe some other a protic solvent both bromines will be placed on the double bond.
Zale101
  • Zale101
|dw:1447035581289:dw|
abb0t
  • abb0t
Try this: |dw:1447035634276:dw|
Zale101
  • Zale101
The first one is halohydrin, and the second one is halogenation. I messed up on those two.
abb0t
  • abb0t
This is also addition reaction (in case you were wondering)
abb0t
  • abb0t
Uh, why did you add water?
abb0t
  • abb0t
That's already -10
Zale101
  • Zale101
i was thinking of acid-catalyzed hydration >.<
abb0t
  • abb0t
Why? Yes, this is an acid, a lewis acid. But I didn't state water here.
abb0t
  • abb0t
Actually, disregard this, I think you may not have covered this yet, although, you should be once you cover markovnikov rule, which you can use to rationalize this.
abb0t
  • abb0t
Sorry.
abb0t
  • abb0t
It is addition reaction, but perhaps a bit more later covered in organic I
Zale101
  • Zale101
Can you go over it?
abb0t
  • abb0t
Have you learned markovnikov rule
Zale101
  • Zale101
Yes.
Zale101
  • Zale101
it was pretty recent though :P
abb0t
  • abb0t
You basically have a lewis acid, an electrophile bonded to a nucleophile.
abb0t
  • abb0t
keep in mind that protins aren't the only electrophilics that can initiate an addition rxn wth double bonds.
abb0t
  • abb0t
|dw:1447036589530:dw|
abb0t
  • abb0t
first electrophile adds, forming a carbocation intermediate, as the Nu:\(^-\) comes in and attacks.
Zale101
  • Zale101
|dw:1447036625877:dw| I know that the elctrophile addition is when alkenes attacks a nucleophile. Pi bonds are able to act as nucleophile.
abb0t
  • abb0t
also always remember electronegativity (although it is a very basic principle, it is a very powerful tool in all fields of chemistry, specially organic and if you decide to go into solid-state chemistyr, as well). by thinking of electronegativity differences you can sort of see where addition reagents into electrophilic and nucleophilic moieties go.
Zale101
  • Zale101
What's protins?
abb0t
  • abb0t
protons*
Zale101
  • Zale101
Ok.
greatlife44
  • greatlife44
|dw:1447037173518:dw| seems like there is a nucleophile and an electrophile in this bond. i'm wondering if oxygen is partially positive here in this bond and acts as an electrophile?
abb0t
  • abb0t
Yes, an electrophile.
greatlife44
  • greatlife44
wow great question BTW
Photon336
  • Photon336
|dw:1447046670516:dw|
abb0t
  • abb0t
No offense photon, but thats the ugliest drawing I have ever seen of a methylcyclopentene
Photon336
  • Photon336
lmao haha

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