TheCatMan
  • TheCatMan
i need a verification on 0^0
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
okay
girlmeetsworld
  • girlmeetsworld
nice profile pic. :)
girlmeetsworld
  • girlmeetsworld
lol

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More answers

TheCatMan
  • TheCatMan
same to you
jango_IN_DTOWN
  • jango_IN_DTOWN
its undefinedddddddddd
girlmeetsworld
  • girlmeetsworld
thanks. :)
TheCatMan
  • TheCatMan
correct un defined
girlmeetsworld
  • girlmeetsworld
i like the new pic better lol
TheCatMan
  • TheCatMan
same here
TheCatMan
  • TheCatMan
i need to get to next class the verification for correcting the teachers error
alekos
  • alekos
No its defined as 1
jango_IN_DTOWN
  • jango_IN_DTOWN
a^0=1 for all real a not equal to 0 a^0 is undefined when a=0 @alekos
alekos
  • alekos
No, that's incorrect. It is definitely mathematically defined as 1
jango_IN_DTOWN
  • jango_IN_DTOWN
http://mathforum.org/dr.math/faq/faq.0.to.0.power.html
jango_IN_DTOWN
  • jango_IN_DTOWN
@alekos
alekos
  • alekos
Yes, that's wonderful and I know all of this, but in the end it's been defined mathematically and the modern convention is to define 0^0=1, for good reason. Why? Because it lets us manipulate exponentials without adding special cases. Donald Knuth set things straight in 1992, Donald Knuth is a professor Emeritus at Stanford University.
jango_IN_DTOWN
  • jango_IN_DTOWN
https://www.math.hmc.edu/funfacts/ffiles/10005.3-5.shtml @alekos
thomas5267
  • thomas5267
I think it is more of a convenience to define \(0^0\) to be 1. The limit of \(x^y\) does not exist as (x,y) to (0,0). Different direction of approach will yield different results.
alekos
  • alekos
there's a difference between pure maths and what's regarded as a definition. this is one of those cases. kind of similar to 0!=1
thomas5267
  • thomas5267
You could argue 0!=1 as (n-1)!=n!/n so 0!=1!/1=1. For 0^0 you can't really make such argument and it is for convenience only IMO.
alekos
  • alekos
Yes, I don't disagree with you. But that is the way it has been defined, and it has to be treated in that regard.

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