anonymous
  • anonymous
This question might sound kind of weird and stupid to someone who is experienced. Where do I go to code and make a program? I've learned a good amount of java, and now that I've learned it I don't know what to do with what I know.
Computer Science
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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BGrg007
  • BGrg007
you can download an IDE for java like intellij and practice your coding there. It also compiles and runs your program, so no need for a terminal.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Can anyone help me in understanding the concept of Key Distribution Center(KDC)
woodrow73
  • woodrow73
If you are using windows, this is a good guide to set up java on your system: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfPE--hWjGY Likewise you could probably find a nice tutorial (and bad ones) for any system.

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theEric
  • theEric
Hi! I liked IntelliJ also! https://www.jetbrains.com/idea/ For help using it, here's their help: https://www.jetbrains.com/idea/documentation/ You know about how to write code, you say. So now you want it to do something. So here's a summary about what's involved as far as I recall. You need the Java Development Kit (JDK). That has everything you \(need\), but maybe not as much as you want. The JDK has quite a few components that are necessary for any java development. Get it here: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/jdk8-downloads-2133151.html Or, if you also want NetBeans (another IDE like IntelliJ), then go to: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/jdk-netbeans-jsp-142931.html And that's all you need. You also want an Integrated Development Environment (IDE), though. It's a program that helps you write code. See, the JDK comes with the compiler, which is that magical program that takes your text and turns it into something that the JRE knows what to do with it. So, you could just write that text. But you should try an IDE for coding faster and more organized. In an IDE, you create a project that just keeps everything together. Then you can manage your code and resources in folders easily from within the IDE. The IDE will point out code typos, and help you finish your statements. Renaming variables is honestly a lovely feature. So that's all that I suggest - the JDK and some IDE. There is also the Application Programming Interface documentation (API documentation). The short story on APIs is that there's already a lot of code other people wrote and compiled for you to use and the documentation helps you understand it. Get the JDK API documentation here: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/documentation/jdk8-doc-downloads-2133158.html By the way. Most of those links came from this page: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/index.html Also by the way. The latest JDKs you see on those links are JDK 8u65 and 8u66. The 66 has some security patches and updates while the 65 just has the patches. Good luck finally working with the code! You might find that it's a little different going from overall knowledge to being as nit picky as the computer, but it's an adjustment that will happen with practice. In fact, it's great practice to do away with the IDE and stick to text - it's so brutal that you'll learn to rely on yourself more than the IDE. But IDEs are faster. And easier. And, often, provide nice features and slick color schemes. Take care!

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