xkshx
  • xkshx
Help with English Questions? 1. From The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain There was a rustling of dresses, and the standing congregation sat down. The boy whose history this book relates did not enjoy the prayer, he only endured it-if he even did that much. He was restive all through it; he kept tally of the details of the prayer, unconsciously-for he was not listening, but he knew the ground of old, and the clergyman's regular route over it-and when a little trifle of new matter was interlarded, his ear detected it and his whole nature resented it; he considered additions unfair, and scoundrelly. In the midst of the prayer a fly had lit on the back of the pew in front of him and tortured his spirit by calmly rubbing its hands together, embracing its head with its arms, and polishing it so vigorously that it seemed to almost part company with the body, and the slender thread of a neck was exposed to view; scraping its wings with its hind legs and smoothing them to its body as if they had been coat-tails; going through its whole toilet as tranquilly as if it knew it was perfectly safe. As indeed it was; for as sorely as Tom's hands itched to grab for it they did not dare-he believed his soul would be instantly destroyed if he did such a thing while the prayer was going on. But with the closing sentence his hand began to curve and steal forward; and the instant the "Amen" was out the fly was a prisoner of war. His aunt detected the act and made him let it go. The minister gave out his text and droned along monotonously through an argument that was so prosy that many a head by and by began to nod-and yet it was an argument that dealt in limitless fire and brimstone and thinned the predestined elect down to a company so small as to be hardly worth the saving. Tom counted the pages of the sermon; after church he always knew how many pages there had been, but he seldom knew anything else about the discourse. However, this time he was really interested for a little while. The minister made a grand and moving picture of the assembling together of the world's hosts at the millennium when the lion and the lamb should lie down together and a little child should lead them. But the pathos, the lesson, the moral of the great spectacle were lost upon the boy; he only thought of the conspicuousness of the principal character before the on-looking nations; his face lit with the thought, and he said to himself that he wished he could be that child, if it was a tame lion. Read these lines from the excerpt again: He was restive all through it; he kept tally of the details of the prayer, unconsciously-for he was not listening, but he knew the ground of old, and the clergyman's regular route over it-and when a little trifle of new matter was interlarded, his ear detected it and his whole nature resented it; he considered additions unfair, and scoundrelly. Which word from the excerpt helps define the word trifle? (4 points) Select one: a. Route b. Details c. Ground d. Tally 2. A very handsome young lady in the store offered me a pair of blue gloves. I did not want blue, but she said they would look very pretty on a hand like mine. The remark touched me tenderly. I glanced furtively at my hand, and somehow it did seem rather a comely member. I tried a glove on my left, and blushed a little. Manifestly the size was too small for me. But I felt gratified when she said: "Oh, it is just right!" yet I knew it was no such thing. I tugged at it diligently, but it was discouraging work. She said: "Ah! I see you are accustomed to wearing kid gloves while some gentlemen are so awkward about putting them on." It was the last compliment I had expected. I only understand about putting on the buckskin article perfectly. I made another effort, and tore the glove from the base of the thumb into the palm of the hand, and tried to hide the tear. She kept up her compliments, and I kept up my determination to deserve them or die. "Ah, you have had experience!" (Yes, a rip down the back of the hand) "They are just right for you-your hand is very small-if they tear, you need not pay for them." (There was a rent across the middle.) "I can always tell when a gentleman understands putting on kid gloves. There is a grace about it that only comes with long patience." (Meanwhile, my efforts caused the whole afterguard of the glove to "fetch away," as the sailors say, and then the fabric parted across the knuckles, and nothing was left but a melancholy ruin.) I was too much flattered to make an exposure and throw the merchandise on the angel's hands. I was hot, vexed, confused, yet still happy, but I hated the other boys for taking such an absorbing interest in the proceedings. I wished they were in Jericho. I felt exquisitely mean when I said cheerfully: "This one does very well; it fits elegantly. I like a glove that fits. No, never mind, ma'am, never mind; I'll put the other on in the street. It is warm here." It was warm. It was the warmest place I ever was in. I paid the bill, and, as I passed out with a fascinating bow, I thought I detected a light in the woman's eye that was gently ironical, and when I looked back from the street, and she was laughing to herself about something or other, I said to myself, with withering sarcasm: "Oh, certainly; you know how to put on kid gloves, don't you?-a self-complacent heel, ready to be flattered out of your senses by every petticoat that chooses to take the trouble to do it!" And I tried to remember why I had entered the store in the first place, and if I shouldn't return on the morrow to complete my initial mission. Read these lines from the excerpt again: I was hot, vexed, confused, yet still happy, but I hated the other boys for taking such an absorbing interest in the proceedings. I wished they were in Jericho. I felt exquisitely mean when I said cheerfully: "This one does very well; it fits elegantly. I like a glove that fits. No, never mind, ma'am, never mind; I'll put the other on in the street. It is warm here." This excerpt from the story shows that the narrator (4 points) Select one: a. thinks the shop girl should help the other boys b. is curious about the boys' interest in what is going on c. wants to stop the boys from having fun at his expense d. feels angry about the boys purchasing gloves
English
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
chestercat
  • chestercat
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
-SpencerBraz-
  • -SpencerBraz-
what you need help with :3
xkshx
  • xkshx
I have B for 1 and C or D for 2
-SpencerBraz-
  • -SpencerBraz-
hmmmmmmmm alright

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

seb.cal
  • seb.cal
Question 1 = B. Question 2 = C (the boys didn't buy gloves).
-SpencerBraz-
  • -SpencerBraz-
b is good, and c
seb.cal
  • seb.cal
Reason why "C" = Answer for Question 2: "... I hated the other boys for taking such an absorbing interest in the proceedings." is the main detail that shows the boys were having fun at his expense, but that is the only time they are mentioned in the passage. It is not "D" because they did not buy any gloves.
xkshx
  • xkshx
Ok thank you so much!!
seb.cal
  • seb.cal
You got it ;)
xkshx
  • xkshx
Could you look at one more for me? @seb.cal
seb.cal
  • seb.cal
Sure thing! Go ahead and post it :)
xkshx
  • xkshx
Thank you! From The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain He worshipped this new angel with furtive eye, till he saw that she had discovered him; then he pretended he did not know she was present, and began to "show off" in all sorts of absurd boyish ways, in order to win her admiration. He kept up this grotesque foolishness for some time; but by-and-by, while he was in the midst of some dangerous gymnastic performances, he glanced aside and saw that the little girl was wending her way toward the house. Tom came up to the fence and leaned on it, grieving, and hoping she would tarry yet awhile longer. She halted a moment on the steps and then moved toward the door. Tom heaved a great sigh as she put her foot on the threshold. But his face lit up, right away, for she tossed a pansy over the fence a moment before she disappeared. Identify the word that best describes Tom Sawyer as he is depicted in this excerpt. (4 points) Select one: a. Reckless b. Modest c. Distracted d. Angry
xkshx
  • xkshx
I know it is not d
seb.cal
  • seb.cal
I think it's "A" because in the text is says, "...while he was in the midst of some dangerous gymnastic performances."
seb.cal
  • seb.cal
Yeah, "A" seems the best choice.
xkshx
  • xkshx
Okay that's what I was thinking.
seb.cal
  • seb.cal
Is that all you need help with for now? :)
xkshx
  • xkshx
I think so, Im going to go submit my exam now. Thank you again!
seb.cal
  • seb.cal
Cool, good luck, and no problem! :)

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.