anonymous
  • anonymous
Will Fan and medal. I have a few Physics calculations on a worksheet and was wondering if anyone would mind checking my answers. Thanks! Note: All answers must be expressed in significant digits. While mowing your lawn, you push a lawnmower with a constant force of 300. N. How much work have you done, assuming all force is in the same direction as the direction of motion? My Answer: 36000 Joules An elevator lifts a person 24.4 m with a force of 300. N in 15.0 seconds. what is the power of the elevator? My Answer: 490 J
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
hold on...
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm not sure, but both seem right.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thank yous so much!

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
im not sure though.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thanks!
anonymous
  • anonymous
What's the distance that it gave you for a? Can't tell if it's correct or not because we're not given enough information. b). Seems about right
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
In the second scenario, the motion is opposed to the force of gravity, hence work is performed. However in the first scenario, the motion is perpendicular to the force of gravity, no work is performed.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@UnkleRhaukus It's not asking about the work due to gravity. It's asking how much work have *you* done. If the force you exert on an object is parallel to the motion of that object, then you are doing work on that object.
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
What forces oppose the motion? none have been specified.
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
If potential energy has not been achieved, no work has been performed.
anonymous
  • anonymous
From all the courses I've had that involve work, we can define it as\[\huge \text{W}=\vec{\text{F}} \cdot \vec{\text{r}}\] There's nothing in that equation that specifies opposite forces. The work due to gravity for displacement that is perpendicular to gravity is 0.
anonymous
  • anonymous
From Work-Energy Principle: \[\huge \text{W}=\Delta \text{KE}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
Net work, that is.
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
When the radial vector is in the opposite direction to the force, \(W = Fr\). When the radial vector is in the same direction as the force, \(W = -Fr\). When the radial vector is perpendicular to the force, the dot product is zero.
anonymous
  • anonymous
But cos(180) (for displacement vector opposite of force vector) = -1. It looks like you have it switched?
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
W = work performed by you, (not work performed by the force field)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes, I realize that. If I apply a force on an object, and it moves parallel and in the same direction as the force vector, then it will yield W=Fr
anonymous
  • anonymous
That is something that I have done in multiple courses. I am not sure what you are still getting at.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.