anonymous
  • anonymous
A square piece of cardboard is formed into a box by cutting 10-centimeter squares from each of the four corners and then folding up the sides, as shown in the figure below. If the volume V of the box is to be 64,000 cm3, what size square piece of cardboard is needed? Recall that V = LWH. length: width:
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
I got 40 and 40. but it is incorrect
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes.
DanJS
  • DanJS
an even amount is cut off the sides, so you get L - 20 for the remaining side (a dimension of the box)

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
so if i got 40 for my length, its the width will be 20? but i thought that because the square was equal on every side, all sides would be 40.
DanJS
  • DanJS
|dw:1449371793497:dw|
DanJS
  • DanJS
it is a square, call each side S, the 10x10 corners are cut, removes 20 total from each side S
DanJS
  • DanJS
notice the box , when folded, will have two of the dimensions as S-20, the other is that height, the 10
DanJS
  • DanJS
fold where dotted lines are |dw:1449372130634:dw|
DanJS
  • DanJS
square base S-20 and the height 10
anonymous
  • anonymous
so would i use 10(s-20)
DanJS
  • DanJS
they tell you it is a square first off, the lengh = width
DanJS
  • DanJS
the folded box has V=L*W*H = (S - 20) * (S - 20) * 10
DanJS
  • DanJS
the'Square' cardboard needed has side S = length = width
anonymous
  • anonymous
so (s-20)(s-20)*10 would give you (s^2 -40s+400)*10
DanJS
  • DanJS
yeah, and they tell you that is 64000 cm^3
anonymous
  • anonymous
so what do i do now?
DanJS
  • DanJS
solve 10*(s^2 -40s + 400) = 64000
anonymous
  • anonymous
10(s^2 -40s + 400) =64,000 10s^2-400s+4,000=64,000 10s^2-400s=60,000
DanJS
  • DanJS
that s^2 - 40s + 400 is just more work, 6400 = (S-2)^2 abs(S - 2) = 80
DanJS
  • DanJS
solves to S - 2 = 80 and S-2 = -80 we consider positive values only, a physical length measure
anonymous
  • anonymous
so is that the length or width? 82
mathmale
  • mathmale
I'll use Dan's suggestion: Let the length of one side of the square of cardboard be represented by L. Our job is to find L. If squares that are 10 cm by 10 cm are cut off all four corners of the piece of cardboard, the length of one side of the bottom of the box is then L-2(10cm), or L-20. The volume of the box is given; it is 64,000 cm^3. But there's also a formula for that volume, given in terms of L. It is (L-20)(L-20)(10). Form an equation from this information. Solve it for L. The piece of cardboard must have dimensions L by L cm.
anonymous
  • anonymous
i solved it and got 82 by 82
DanJS
  • DanJS
had some laundry,, 82 looks good
DanJS
  • DanJS
you just have to first divide by 10, then square root, easier than all that expanding stuff
DanJS
  • DanJS
since it is 'square'
anonymous
  • anonymous
but i just typed it in and i got it wrong
DanJS
  • DanJS
do you have to include the unit measurement
DanJS
  • DanJS
o haha, i see
DanJS
  • DanJS
i put in L-2 not 20 in the calculator.. and even typed it a few times, using 20 instead , you get a positive value of 100 cm
DanJS
  • DanJS
same pretty much, 80 + 20 and -80 + 20 real length + measure
mathmale
  • mathmale
Strictly speaking, you can do the math without the dimensions "cm." I prefer to inc lude the dimensions so as not to lose track of what we're measuring. Let the length of one side of the square of cardboard be represented by L. Our job is to find L. If squares that are 10 cm by 10 cm are cut off all four corners of the piece of cardboard, the length of one side of the bottom of the box is then L-2(10cm), or L-20. The volume of the box is given; it is 64,000 cm^3. But there's also a formula for that volume, given in terms of L. It is (L-20)(L-20)(10). Form an equation from this information. Solve it for L. The piece of cardboard must have dimensions L by L cm. For those who don't want to go through all this work, just check out the proposed answer (L=82 cm) in (L-20)(L-20)(10). If the result is 64,000 cm^3, then L=82 cm is correct.
anonymous
  • anonymous
it is incorrect.
DanJS
  • DanJS
used L - 2 as mistypings to solve using 20 , yua get 100 for the + value
mathmale
  • mathmale
@chikennooget : Earlier, y ou typed in :"i solved it and got 82 by 82" Time to do some checking to find out what went wrong. Or, solve (L-20)(L-20)(10)=64000 for L.
anonymous
  • anonymous
i got 272.982
mathmale
  • mathmale
Check that: Does [ (272.982-20)^2 ]^2*10 equal 64000? First you calculated that L=82, then as 272.982. Dan calculated L to be 100. Try L=100. Then go back and check L=272.982. Conculusion?
mathmale
  • mathmale
I have to get off the 'Net now. Good luck!

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.