anonymous
  • anonymous
This one is for @mathmale just for you buddy. if you need help I can assist you. : A teacher usually divides his class into six groups of "n" students each. However, on Monday, three of the students were absent, so the teacher divided the remaining students into seven groups of "m" students each. On Tuesday, four students were absent, so he went back to "n" students per group, but there were only five groups. How many students are in the class? Please explain your answer thoroughly!
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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chestercat
  • chestercat
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anonymous
  • anonymous
Got the answer yet?
mathmale
  • mathmale
"Just for you, buddy?" Are we buddies? Why me? ;)
anonymous
  • anonymous
do you not want to be my buddy? and because you had to make me be specific about my answer!

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More answers

mathmale
  • mathmale
First thoughts: write a series of algebraic equations to model the given situation. Let c=class size. "6 groups of n students" translates into what equation? Happy to be your buddy.
anonymous
  • anonymous
idk i mean i do but you have to try that yourself
anonymous
  • anonymous
do you want the answer?
mathmale
  • mathmale
Me? Want the answer before we've tried to solve the problem? Unimaginable.
anonymous
  • anonymous
heres the answer its 24 students
anonymous
  • anonymous
I knew the answer I just wanted to see if you could solve it.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Aw, you've spoiled my fun. And I was all excited just getting started.
anonymous
  • anonymous
but what was the equation if I spoiled your fun?
mathmale
  • mathmale
Wow. Got a vendetta against people who want you to show all steps and explain your assumptions? According to Merriam-Webster: vendetta: ": a series of acts done by someone over a long period of time to cause harm to a disliked person or group"
baru
  • baru
interestingly, i find that "so the teacher divided the remaining students into seven groups of "m" students each" is of no use
anonymous
  • anonymous
let me help you if your frustrated..6n=5n+4 6n-5n=4 n=4 No. of students -= 6n = 24 if 3 are absent, 24-3 = 21 = 7 groups of 3 m=3
anonymous
  • anonymous
which gives you 24
mathmale
  • mathmale
Really? Suppose the class size is c, but that 3 students are absent. Then the class size becomes c-3, and from that group the teacher formed 7 groups of m students. Some problems are intentionally written with more info than is strictly necessary to solve them, to build student skills in separating the wheat from the chaff. Me, frustrated? Over my dead body. ;)
baru
  • baru
^yea exactly, its actually just two equations and two unknowns
mathmale
  • mathmale
Anyway, Buddy, thanks for the challenge. I turn it down because I don't want to be given answers before I've even started my own problem solution.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Bye for now!

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