korosh23
  • korosh23
Chemistry 12 Question! Low solubility means to have a solution that has a solubility of less than 0.1 M. Is that true?
Chemistry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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katieb
  • katieb
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korosh23
  • korosh23
However, something is confusing in this sentence. Equal volumes of 0.2 M compound A and 0.2 M compound B are mixed. ppt is formed which means low solubility, but why it is 0.2 M? The M should be less than 0.1 M in order to be qualified for low solubility. Please explain. Thank you.
korosh23
  • korosh23
@matt101
rvc
  • rvc
low solubility has a particular value? i never heard about that value then lets google

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rvc
  • rvc
@baru @ganeshie8
korosh23
  • korosh23
ok
korosh23
  • korosh23
The term soluble means > 0.1 mol/L at 25 degree celcius
korosh23
  • korosh23
Insoluble means less.
rvc
  • rvc
let me tag ppl @AravindG
rvc
  • rvc
@sweetburger :)
AravindG
  • AravindG
I haven't heard about low solubility being <1. There ain't any IUPAC standard for low solubility as far as I know. There is relative solubility though. It helps to compare solubilities.
korosh23
  • korosh23
Ok, I guess they are teaching me something to prepare me for those information in the future. Thank you guys
korosh23
  • korosh23
@rvc can I ask you a question?
korosh23
  • korosh23
about double arrows and regular arrows?
korosh23
  • korosh23
in reactions
rvc
  • rvc
double arrows meaning?
rvc
  • rvc
for example?
korosh23
  • korosh23
I know it s indicating equillibrium
korosh23
  • korosh23
but when to use it I do not know because there is a bunch of information given, and I am told to write an equation
korosh23
  • korosh23
I do not know if I have to use double arrow for indicating equilibrium solution or one arrow indicating dissociation. Do you know ?
rvc
  • rvc
atm i m sure @baru will help u :)
korosh23
  • korosh23
ok
rvc
  • rvc
im bit distrubed n busy
korosh23
  • korosh23
ok thank you for your time :)
baru
  • baru
XD no I won't... Don't know a thing in chem
korosh23
  • korosh23
lol really?
korosh23
  • korosh23
Ok this question is confusing as hell, I am gonna ask from my teacher.
baru
  • baru
:)
AravindG
  • AravindG
It depends on the reactants you have and the experimental conditions. See N2+3H2<-->2NH3 is a famous equilibrium equation. We use double arrows here because the product has the tendency to go in backward reaction. Usually unless it a common known equilibrium, the question usually tells us about the condition. So if we can decide to put double arrows or not.
matt101
  • matt101
I know I'm super late (been a busy month for me) but I'll try to clear things up if you still aren't sure. 0.1 M seems to be an arbitrary cutoff by which something is considered to have low solubility. For instance, if you have one substance with a solubility of 0.101 M and another with a solubility of 0.099 M, the difference in solubility is trivial, but by your definition only one is considered to have "low solubility". I'd say that using 0.1 M as a cutoff is only useful when you have substances with very different solubilities (e.g. orders of magnitude different). As far as your question is concerned, you need to realize that the 0.2 M refers only to the STARTING concentrations of each substance when SEPARATED. Let's pretend these substances are each ions (an anion and a cation) which, on their own, dissolve in water. However, when you mix the two together, you create an equilibrium situation between the dissociated ions and the precipitate they form. If that PRECIPITATE has a low solubility (i.e. less than 0.1 M), most of the ions will come together to form the precipitate, and very few will remain dissociated as they were in their original, separate solutions. When we talk about solubility, we're talking about the concentration of the DISSOCIATED ions, not the precipitate (which isn't dissolved, meaning it doesn't make sense to talk about its "concentration" anyways), which in this case will be extremely low (and likely less than 0.1 M). I hope that made sense and answered your question!

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