anonymous
  • anonymous
Reagan's economic plan was based on which of these? A) supply-side economics B) demand-based economy C) Say's law of markets D) Malthus Theory
History
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
A) Supply-side economics
Frozen15
  • Frozen15
Supply-side economics is a macroeconomic theory[1][2] which argues that economic growth can be most effectively created by investing in capital, and by lowering barriers on the production of goods and services. According to supply-side economics, consumers will then benefit from a greater supply of goods and services at lower prices; furthermore, the investment and expansion of businesses will increase the demand for employees and therefore create jobs. Typical policy recommendations of supply-side economists are lower marginal tax rates and less government regulation.[3] The term "supply-side economics" was thought, for some time, to have been coined by journalist Jude Wanniski in 1975, but according to Robert D. Atkinson's Supply-Side Follies,[4] the term "supply side" ("supply-side fiscalists") was first used by Herbert Stein, a former economic adviser to President Nixon, in 1976, and only later that year was this term repeated by Jude Wanniski. Its use connotes the ideas of economists Robert Mundell and Arthur Laffer. Supply-side economics is likened by critics to the theory of trickle-down economics,[5][6][7] which may, however, not actually have been seriously advocated by any economist in that form.[8][9] The Laffer curve illustrates a central theory of supply-side economics, that lowering tax rates may generate more government revenue than would otherwise be expected at the lower tax rate because moving off of a prohibitively high tax system could generate more economic activity, which would lead to increased opportunities for tax revenues.[10][11] However, the Laffer curve only measures the rate of taxation, not tax incidence, which is a stronger predictor of whether a tax code change is stimulative or dampening.[12] In addition, studies have shown that tax cuts done in the US in the past several decades seldom recoup revenue losses and have minimal impact on GDP growth.[13]
anonymous
  • anonymous
i have 4 more

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anonymous
  • anonymous
@Monfredis96 medal @Frozen15 for meh
anonymous
  • anonymous
i gotcha @Frozen15
Frozen15
  • Frozen15
I explained so I should have gotten medal she didn't explain how it was -_-
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Fozen15 should get one...

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