countrygirl1431
  • countrygirl1431
Could some one please help me with this question ive posted it 4 times and no one has helped me i thought this was suppose to be a site where students could get help!!
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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countrygirl1431
  • countrygirl1431
In "The Man with the Hoe," the poet is concerned with the beauties of life in the country. True False
anonymous
  • anonymous
oops wrong place sorry
countrygirl1431
  • countrygirl1431
do u mund not posting that on my question i really need help please remove that

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countrygirl1431
  • countrygirl1431
thanks
anonymous
  • anonymous
Im very sorry
countrygirl1431
  • countrygirl1431
its ok
countrygirl1431
  • countrygirl1431
@Ephemera
anonymous
  • anonymous
Haven't read that, sorry
anonymous
  • anonymous
1) This is a site for math help 2) If you have read the poem, the answer should be obvious
anonymous
  • anonymous
Judging by title it's prob true.
countrygirl1431
  • countrygirl1431
i have resd it but i cant underst it and 2 i dont care what section this is ive tried posting it in english no one ever help
anonymous
  • anonymous
can you post the poem on here please
anonymous
  • anonymous
ill read it
anonymous
  • anonymous
The fact that you didn't receive help on the English help site is of no concern to those of us on this math help site.
countrygirl1431
  • countrygirl1431
actually it is its all one site and your suppose to be helping not socializing
anonymous
  • anonymous
@countrygirl1431 can you copy and paste the poem? or story what ever it is.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Poem sorry:P
countrygirl1431
  • countrygirl1431
no i cant get the poem to out up right now for some reason
anonymous
  • anonymous
can you give me the link or...?
anonymous
  • anonymous
is it a pdf?
anonymous
  • anonymous
BOWED by the weight of centuries he leans Upon his hoe and gazes on the ground, The emptiness of ages in his face, And on his back the burden of the world. Who made him dead to rapture and despair, 5 A thing that grieves not and that never hopes, Stolid and stunned, a brother to the ox? Who loosened and let down this brutal jaw? Whose was the hand that slanted back this brow? Whose breath blew out the light within this brain? 10 Is this the thing the Lord God made and gave To have dominion over sea and land; To trace the stars and search the heavens for power; To feel the passion of Eternity? Is this the dream He dreamed who shaped the suns 15 And marked their ways upon the ancient deep? Down all the stretch of Hell to its last gulf There is no shape more terrible than this— More tongued with censure of the world’s blind greed— More filled with signs and portents for the soul— 20 More fraught with menace to the universe. What gulfs between him and the seraphim! Slave of the wheel of labor, what to him Are Plato and the swing of Pleiades? What the long reaches of the peaks of song, 25 The rift of dawn, the reddening of the rose? Through this dread shape the suffering ages look; Time’s tragedy is in that aching stoop; Through this dread shape humanity betrayed, Plundered, profaned and disinherited, 30 Cries protest to the Judges of the World, A protest that is also prophecy. O masters, lords and rulers in all lands, Is this the handiwork you give to God, This monstrous thing distorted and soul-quenched? 35 How will you ever straighten up this shape; Touch it again with immortality; Give back the upward looking and the light; Rebuild in it the music and the dream; Make right the immemorial infamies, 40 Perfidious wrongs, immedicable woes? O masters, lords and rulers in all lands, How will the Future reckon with this Man? How answer his brute question in that hour When whirlwinds of rebellion shake the world? 45 How will it be with kingdoms and with kings— With those who shaped him to the thing he is— When this dumb Terror shall reply to God, After the silence of the centuries?
anonymous
  • anonymous
In "The Man with the Hoe," the poet is concerned with the beauties of life in the country. True False
countrygirl1431
  • countrygirl1431
thts it
anonymous
  • anonymous
Check this for a complete analysis http://www.enotes.com/topics/man-with-hoe/in-depth
anonymous
  • anonymous
So false i think
countrygirl1431
  • countrygirl1431
thanks
anonymous
  • anonymous
w8 actualy i think it could be true
anonymous
  • anonymous
nah i think false false
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Whitemonsterbunny17 im not sure bout this
anonymous
  • anonymous
im pretty sure its false
countrygirl1431
  • countrygirl1431
ok i got it thanks
anonymous
  • anonymous
is it correct??
countrygirl1431
  • countrygirl1431
i wont know till i send it in

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