anonymous
  • anonymous
Can someone help me with these problems? I'm not sure how to do them and I have to turn it in tomorrow.
Geometry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
katieb
  • katieb
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
sure what problems
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
Hello! I'm definitely willing to try! What's the first question? ^_^
AlexandervonHumboldt2
  • AlexandervonHumboldt2
what are your questions?

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
i cant really read the first one
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
Question, on the first question, reason #2, how do you know it's the definition of midpoint? Point C hasn't been mentioned as the midpoint of line BD
RAM231
  • RAM231
perpendicular is the opposite of parallel. so if parallel is like a parallelogram, and its like a train track. what would perpendicular mean?
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
I feel like
anonymous
  • anonymous
@sleepyjess I don't know what i'm doing, I tried looking for examples online and i guessed.
anonymous
  • anonymous
ans easy way to remember perpendicular is: imagine a big lowercase t
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
Okay, normally all of the "Given"s will be in the first couple of slots
anonymous
  • anonymous
or cross
anonymous
  • anonymous
In the second picture, would the Statement #2 be AC BD for definition of perpendicular?
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
We already used AC perpendicular to BD, perpendicular means there will be right angles somewhere. Where do you think there would be right angles knowing that AC is perpendicular to BD?
anonymous
  • anonymous
angle c?
anonymous
  • anonymous
or would it be angle 1 and angle 2
RAM231
  • RAM231
with perpendicular lines, @sleepyjess they don't always have to have right angles in them. just a thought
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
Perpendicular means that there will be right angles
RAM231
  • RAM231
not how I learned it in school and I am in 11th grade geometry
RAM231
  • RAM231
and my twin is in AP pre calculous
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
I took precal in 10th grade, A line is perpendicular to another if it meets or crosses it at right angles (90°). Perpendicular means "at right angles". A line meeting another at a right angle, or 90° is said to be perpendicular to it. http://www.mathopenref.com/perpendicular.html
RAM231
  • RAM231
|dw:1449806960244:dw| these can be perpendicular lines, and they don't cross at 90 degrees.....
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
Those are not perpendicular lines
RAM231
  • RAM231
im not going to fight. But being in a house full of smart mathletes that compete in competitions and win... I know what they are....
anonymous
  • anonymous
what is the isosceles triangle theorem?
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
Sorry about that jcr, would you like to continue with the problems?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes please
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
This is what I found about it: Isosceles Triangle Theorems. The Base Angles Theorem. If two sides of a triangle are congruent, then the angles opposite those sides are congruent. Converse of the Base Angles Theorem. http://www.mathwarehouse.com/geometry/congruent_triangles/isosceles-triangle-theorems-proofs.php
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
I've actually never heard of that...
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
Are we doing #50 right now?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes, #50
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
Okay, we're looking for 2 angles that are 90 degrees, on line BD
anonymous
  • anonymous
angle 1 and angle 2
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
Yes! So for the statement on #2, it will be <1 \(\cong\) <2
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay. for 3. would it be reflexive?
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
Now we have to figure out something that will make triangle ABD isosceles...
anonymous
  • anonymous
Sides AB and AD are congruent. Would that be part of it? because isosceles has two = sides
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
I feel like the statement is going to be AB \(\cong\) AD, but I'm not sure of the reason
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay, so what about #5? Im not sure on that one
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
I honestly am just going around in circles with this....
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1449808300747:dw| This is what I have for markings on the picture
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
Why can't we just prove that ABC \(\cong\) ADC now...
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm not sure. Can we go look at the other one?
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
@myininaya , can you help?
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
I can help with your number 49 :)
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
Let's look at your step 2 in your problem 49 if \(AB\) is parallel to \(DE\) then that means that \(AE\) and \(BD\) are "traversals" right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
so what would that make your comparisons between your Angle 1 and Angle 2 or Angle 3 and Angle 4 ? (what can those pairs be classified as?) :)
myininaya
  • myininaya
By the way just so no one is confused about a earlier debate on this thread... Two lines are perpendicular if at their crossing the 4 angles formed there are 90 degrees... |dw:1449809081389:dw| sorry to interrupt
anonymous
  • anonymous
alternate exterior??
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
ooo really close! but since they are Inside the triangles and between the two parallel lines it would be "alternate interior" does that make sense? :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
great! so that would be your step two :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
So for step 3 am I correct on the vertical angles?
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
#49 step 3 is perfect :) then onto step 4 it is the second to last step so perhaps we should try proving that the Triangles are congruent what Congruency Postulate do you think we can use to prove that the Triangles are congruent?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Is it called Angle Angle?
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
hmm close! remember that we were given that there's a side that's congruent too? :) AB = DE
anonymous
  • anonymous
Angle Side Angle?
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
even closer!! but not quite http://prntscr.com/9csnyj
anonymous
  • anonymous
Side Angle Angle?
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
Yes! there you go :)
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
Would you have an idea on what the last reason might be? :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Would it be cpctc? I remember hearing it but im not sure if thats it
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
^^ that is exactly it! :D
anonymous
  • anonymous
I was wondering if you could help me on one more thing? Its different from this
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
of course I can try :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
When you are given a midpoint and one endpoint, how do you find the other endpoint?
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
This is the formula you are familiar with right? :)|dw:1449810288429:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
so if the Midpoint coordinate is \( (x, y) \) that would mean that \(\huge x = \frac{x_1 + x_2}{2}\) and \(\huge y = \frac{y_1 + y_2}{2}\) does that make sense so far? :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
So if i had the midpoints (-2,9) then I would plug those into the big x and y??
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
exactly :) if you had the Midpoint = (-2, 9) \(x = -2\) \(y = 9\) and one of the end points \((x_1, y_1)\)
anonymous
  • anonymous
So can i do one and show you? so i can make sure im doing it right?
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
sure:)
anonymous
  • anonymous
So midpoint (4,8) and endpoint ( 5,3)
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
ok what do you think you should do next? :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
to find x would i do 4= to 5+4/2
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
not quite :) I think it would be more like \( \large 4 = \huge \frac{5 + x_2}{2}\) and you would be looking for \(x_2\)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay so for Y, 8= 3+x/2
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
8 = 3+y/2 yes :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
do you need to get y by itself?
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
indeed, that would be the y coordinate of your missing end point :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
subtract y from both sides?
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
you might want to try multiplying both sides by 2 first :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
y=5.3?
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
\[8 = \frac{3+y}{2} \rightarrow 16 = 3 + y\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
divide by 3 on both sides
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
huh why? don't we start with 3 + y 8 = -------- 2 which becomes 16 = 3 + y
anonymous
  • anonymous
is that the answer?
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
not yet 16 = 3 + y -3 -3 try subtracting 3 from both sides to get y alone ------------------- __ = y
anonymous
  • anonymous
13=y
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
perfect :) then the x value would be solve for x from 5 + x 4 = -------- 2
anonymous
  • anonymous
3=x
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
there you go you have now found your missing endpoint :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thank you so much for your help! Sorry it took me so long.
jigglypuff314
  • jigglypuff314
I'm glad I could help ^_^ and don't worry about it, everyone learns at their own pace :)
bubblegum.
  • bubblegum.
@RAM231 Can you please tell me what does perpendicular means :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1449840002906:dw|
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
@bubblegum. , perpendicular means "at right angles". A line meeting another at a right angle, or 90° is said to be perpendicular to it. credit: http://www.mathopenref.com/perpendicular.html
RAM231
  • RAM231
@bubblegum. Perpendicular means lines are crossing. It doesn't have to be at a 90 degree angle. its like a 4 way street. they are perpendicular because they cross each other. This can also be perpendicular. |dw:1449864072050:dw| Because they are passing through the y axis. I just got the answer from my math teacher as well.
sleepyjess
  • sleepyjess
I have now given you multiple resources to show that perpendicular means lines crossing at a 90 degree angle. Whether you choose to believe the truth or not is up to you.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.