xxlyh
  • xxlyh
Justin has limited range of motion in his legs but wants to compete on the obstacle course he and his friends created. What accommodation can be made to help him most fully participate? (3 points) Ask him to watch first so he learns how to negotiate the course Have him complete at his own speed but not for the win Suggest he do practice runs instead of competing Allow him to go around obstacles too difficult
Health Sciences
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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anonymous
  • anonymous
It's B have him compete at his own pace. This is the best way he'll experience the obstacle course to its fullest and have a great time with his peers who helped create it in the first place. And if his limited range in motion gets in the way, his friends could just step in and help, further strengthening their bond. Just plain observing is not full participating. So, we can cross out A. If he just does practice runs instead of competing, that would defeat the purpose, and he'd only feel singled out. So it's not C. And D is just plain mean.
anonymous
  • anonymous
But really it depends on his temperament and that of his peers. Hey you know, whatever works for them.
xxlyh
  • xxlyh
@Cardinal_Carlo wtfff

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xxlyh
  • xxlyh
D was the right answer o.o
xxlyh
  • xxlyh
I;m just-... so confused wtf LOL
anonymous
  • anonymous
My apologies @xxlyh. At the time, I misinterpreted 'go around' to mean that we should make the disabled person go through the difficult obstacles. But now that I take a second glance, I see that it means otherwise.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Allowing him to skip the hard parts, would enable him to participate along his friends. That should have been our answer. In retrospect, it makes sense.

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