Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
What's the charge of Fe2S3 ?
Chemistry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
\[Fe _{2}S _{3}\]
JFraser
  • JFraser
\(Fe_2S_3\) \(has\) no net charge, the formula is \(neutral\)
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Oh, but how do you know? I'm beating myself up trying to find the charge of Fe

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JFraser
  • JFraser
you're looking at 2 different things. The charge of a \(molecule\) is always neutral. the charges of the \(ions\) that make up the formula is what you're really asking for, right?
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
It just asks me what the charge of it is, then says +2, -2, +3, etc
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
I don't know :(
JFraser
  • JFraser
because transition metals usually have more than one option for their charge, it's helpful to look at the ion they are \(paired \space to\) to find the opposite charge, since they must add up to zero.
JFraser
  • JFraser
in this formula, the iron is paired with sulfur. what kind of ion does sulfur form?
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
I thought I had a clue but my brain just farted, would it be cation? Idk how to tell
JFraser
  • JFraser
it's listed second in the formula, meaning the sulfur will have a negative charge. sulfur is also in the same family as \(oxygen\), so if you know the charge that oxygen forms, sulfur will be the same
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
The charge would be 6, right?
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Does the element listed second in a formula always have a negative charge?
JFraser
  • JFraser
6 is the number of valence electrons sulfur has, not its charge.
JFraser
  • JFraser
yes, the non-metal in an ionic compound (which is always listed second) will always have a negative charge
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Of course... then how do you tell?
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Okay that helps
JFraser
  • JFraser
do you know the much about valence electrons, or atomic orbitals & quantum numbers?
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Yes, I always seem to forget the simple stuff
JFraser
  • JFraser
ok, then what's the "magic" number of valence electrons to make an atom happy?
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
The nearest one to the noble gas, no?
JFraser
  • JFraser
yes, and how many valence electrons do the noble gases have?
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
8
JFraser
  • JFraser
good
JFraser
  • JFraser
so a sulfur atom has 6 valence electrons, it "wants" 8 to look just like argon and be "happy"
JFraser
  • JFraser
how many electrons does the sulfur have to pick up to look just like argon?
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Yeah :D
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
2!
JFraser
  • JFraser
great, so picking up 2 valence electrons turns the sulfur \(atom\), \(S\), into the sulfide \(ion\), \(S^{-2}\)
JFraser
  • JFraser
the charge of a sulfide ion is -2
JFraser
  • JFraser
in this formula, there are \(three\) sulfide ions, right?
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Yes there is
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
We multiply?
JFraser
  • JFraser
since each sulfide ion has a charge of -2, and there are 3 of them, what's the \(total\) negative charge?
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
-6!!!!
JFraser
  • JFraser
exactly
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Woah
JFraser
  • JFraser
since the \(total\) charge of the irons \(MUST\) balance the charges from the sulfides, what must the \(total\) positive charge be?
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Positive 6
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
So we multiply by 3 right?
JFraser
  • JFraser
so what we've got is basically this: \(Fe_2S_3\) \(2*(+?) + 3*(-2) = 0\)
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Oh so yeah we have to multiply by three
JFraser
  • JFraser
there's +6 of total positive charge. that positive charge is going to be split evenly between the irons. there are 2 iron ions. What is the charge on \(each\) iron ion going to be?
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
3?
JFraser
  • JFraser
it is a +3
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Yes!
JFraser
  • JFraser
the same basic rules apply to all ionic compounds. the total charge must be zero, so there must be enough positive and negative pieces to balance that charge
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
I see, but I think we're talking about two different things, the answer should be +3 :C
JFraser
  • JFraser
we're actually talking about the exact same thing. You have to use the rules of ionic formulas to figure out what the charges of the partners are
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Okay, I'll research it!!! It made me confused bc of the +3
JFraser
  • JFraser
if the question is "what's the charge of the \(iron\) in the \(Fe_2S_3\)", then the answer is certainly a +3
Melissa_Something
  • Melissa_Something
Oh... because Fe is the metal ion. I feel so bad. Duh!
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
And you'll sometimes see that written as iron(III) sulfide to indicate that the iron is in the +3 state. That compound is also known as pyrite or iron pyrite or fool's gold, the last because it makes shiny crystals that look a bit like gold.

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