anonymous
  • anonymous
Has anyone read Jane Eyre?! I'll medal and fan if you could PLEASE help me out.
English
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
That's a tall order.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think what you can do for now is show us passages you've written, and we'll help you organize those ideas.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Cardinal_Carlo I didn't write anything, they're questions about the book that I need help on.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay, let's get through this. What's one of the questions?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Cardinal_Carlo Thank you! Here's one: Read this statement that Jane makes in Chapter 3. "I asked Aunt Reed once, and she said possibly I might have some poor, low relations called Eyre, but she knew nothing about them." How does Jane's remark foreshadow future events in the novel? A. Aunt Reed's lack of responsibility foreshadows Jane's need to provide for herself. B. Aunt Reed's deceit foreshadows Jane inheriting her uncle's wealth. C. Aunt Reed's honesty foreshadows Jane's poverty when she leaves Thornfield. D. Aunt Reed's kindness foreshadows Jane's acceptance into the Rivers' household.
anonymous
  • anonymous
(Sorry it's so spaced out, Lol.)
anonymous
  • anonymous
I can read just fine. The answer is B.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Cardinal_Carlo Great! Do you have time for some more?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Sure, ask away.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Which is an effect of Jane's narration of the novel? A. The reader expects that Jane will refuse St. John's offer of marriage and eventually be reunited with Mr. Rochester. B. The reader understands Jane's motivations and empathizes with her even though she challenges the conventions of her time. C. The reader knows all of the characters' thoughts and understands their motivations. D. The reader is never certain that Jane will survive her experiences in the novel.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Cardinal_Carlo I'm pretty sure it's D?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Cardinal_Carlo Yes, towards Jane.
anonymous
  • anonymous
So was my answer wrong?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Cardinal_Carlo Yes, I understand!
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Cardinal_Carlo You were only explaining the first question, right? Or were you also hinting at the second question...?
anonymous
  • anonymous
My apologies. I thought we were still on the first question. But for the second question, I believe B is the more comprehensive answer. By having Jane narrate, the readers are drawn into her line of thinking and are able to empathize her with relative ease. Although I do understand you sentiment, at some points in the novel, there are noticeable degrees of uncertainty.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Notice that when you read the novel, you'll almost always feel as if you're well-acquainted with Jane by how she describes her relationships with various people-- from her abusive Aunt to her dearly beloved Rochester, and even to when she said “Reader, I married him.” we could almost always feel what Jane thought and felt at the time.
anonymous
  • anonymous
It's okay! RIGHT, that was my second guess. I see how that makes sense. I have a few more questions, so is that okay if we can continue?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Cardinal_Carlo
anonymous
  • anonymous
Which statement is an accurate portrayal of Helen Burns and Jane Eyre? A. Helen is submissive to the rules at Lowood, while Jane is more headstrong in her views. B. Both Helen and Jane cannot wait until they can leave Lowood School. C. Helen searches for love and acceptance, while Jane seeks justice and punishment for evil. D. Helen is quietly defiant, while Jane is more resigned and accepting of the situation at Lowood.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Helen Burns is one of the girls who died right? @iMariella
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Cardinal_Carlo Yup, she died xD
anonymous
  • anonymous
It's A. Helen was the gentle yet emotionally sound type. She consistently permitted the abuse she received over at Lowood, and in the end passed away having lived a pitiful life. In contrast, Jane was more of the rebel.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Cool! I have ONE more: Read this excerpt. Descending the laurel walk, I faced the wreck of the chestnut-tree; it stood up, black and riven: the trunk split down the centre, gasped ghastly. The cloven halves were not broken from each other, for the firm base and strong roots kept them unsundered below; though community of vitality was destroyed. What does the split chestnut tree symbolize? A. The bleakness at Thornfield after Jane leaves. B. The death of Bertha Mason after the fire at Thornfield. C. The destruction that nature can cause. D. The separation between Jane and Mr. Rochester.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Wait, I have one more after this. I think I know the answer.. I just want to make sure.
anonymous
  • anonymous
It's D. At the time, Jane and Edward became separated for a long while until Jane returned to marry him and have their first son, suggesting that there were still strong roots that held the two together despite being torn apart as the chestnut tree exemplifies.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Cardinal_Carlo Thank you! Here's my last one: Read this dialogue from Chapter 10 of Jane Eyre. "Well, that is beautiful, Miss Jane! It is as fine a picture as any Miss Reed's drawing-master could paint, let alone the young ladies themselves, who could not come near it: and have you learnt French?" "Yes, Bessie, I can both read it and speak it." "And you can work on muslin and canvas?" "I can." "Oh, you are quite a lady, Miss Jane! I knew you would be; you will get on whether your relations notice you or not." What does Bessie express in this conversation with Jane? A. disappointment B. amazement C. satisfaction D. caution
anonymous
  • anonymous
At first I thought it was B, but then I read "I knew you would be" so I was thinking it would be C ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I know what you mean @iMariella. It seems to me that Bessie is just putting up a display of enthusiasm before she used the line (as you said) "I knew you would be" indicating her sign of relief.
anonymous
  • anonymous
C. Satisfaction might be the most appropriate word to describe Bessie's true intention.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Great! Thank you so much! I'll fan you now :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
You're welcome, and thank you.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.