anonymous
  • anonymous
What is the simplified form of x+9/4 + x+5/4
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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anonymous
  • anonymous
I understand 0% of this lesson... Help?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Sorry, typo. x+9/x+1 + x-2/5
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh ok thats better

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Can you help me?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Here are the choices:
1 Attachment
mathmale
  • mathmale
Look at the two given fractions which are being added together. What is the LCD of this set of 2 fractions? LCD = lowest common denominator.
anonymous
  • anonymous
1?
mathmale
  • mathmale
what does LCD mean to you? Hint: It's not 1.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Lowest common denominator.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Yes, and what does lowest common denominator mean in this context?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Denominator is the lower part of the fraction.
mathmale
  • mathmale
yes, and what does lowest common denominator mean? How do you find the LCD if you are given 2 fractions with different denoms. and are asked to add the fractions together?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm not sure off the top of my head what LCD mean in this context.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Better look up Lowest Common Denominator. Or, given 2/3 + 7/8, find the lcd and then add these fractions together.
anonymous
  • anonymous
LCD means the least common multiple of two numbers. So, in this question, 5?
mathmale
  • mathmale
Sorry, no. How did you get 5? Try again. what is the LCD of the 2 fractions, \[\frac{ 2 }{ 3 },\frac{ 7 }{ 8 }?\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
Sorry, I ment the question I asked. The LCD of that question is 24.
anonymous
  • anonymous
For mine it should be 5, right?
mathmale
  • mathmale
all right. add the 2 fractions together, please.
anonymous
  • anonymous
9/24, or 3/8?
anonymous
  • anonymous
3/8 being the simplified form?
mathmale
  • mathmale
are you telling me that the sum of 2/3 and 7/8 is 3/8?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes. Is that wrong?
mathmale
  • mathmale
definitely, I'm sorry to say. How long has it been since you last studied "LCD"?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Since 7th grade. I'm in 10th now.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thats the last time it was reviewed.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Seems as tho' you may need a review. Of course I can help with LCD's, but would prefer not to start from scratch. Since you have internet access, could you look up LCD?
mathmale
  • mathmale
To combine two fractions, you must either have the same denom. in each, or know how to obtain and use the LCD.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay
mathmale
  • mathmale
1/3 - (4/3) = ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
1?
mathmale
  • mathmale
No, try again.
anonymous
  • anonymous
:/
mathmale
  • mathmale
sign error
anonymous
  • anonymous
-1?
mathmale
  • mathmale
Better. Right. find the lcd of 1/x and 2/y
anonymous
  • anonymous
3?
mathmale
  • mathmale
No. If you're interested, here's the URL of a web site that discusses LCDs and how to find them: https://www.khanacademy.org/math/pre-algebra/fractions-pre-alg/equivalent-fractions-pre-alg/v/finding-common-denominators
mathmale
  • mathmale
I'd like to help you, but much prefer you do some reading about LCDs and how to find and use them before we continue. Much material is available on the Internet.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think I'll just find a different source of help. It might be googling the question since is 5 hours past my teachers hours.
mathmale
  • mathmale
any source of info that works for you would be a good starting point.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I have five other tests that need done before 10 tonight. My time, thats only two hours.
mathmale
  • mathmale
i find the Internet to be a wonderful source of info on the spot. I very much sympathize, but also wonder how five tests could pile u p into one night. How long ago were you asked to do these assignments?
anonymous
  • anonymous
the one I'm doing now needed sent in by the 24th of November.
anonymous
  • anonymous
In short, I'm behind.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Surely sounds like it. How did that happen? Do you schedule your study time?
anonymous
  • anonymous
No. Personal issues murdered my sleep schedule and I haven't been able to make it to the online meetings in the mornings.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Let's make the most of the scant time we have. are y ou or are you not going to do some quick research on LCDs on the 'Net? Exactly what do you hope to get from me, other than answers?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I was hoping to get quick help with small explanations.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Seeing as i asked this over a half hour ago, I assume I'm on the wrong site for that kind of help.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Let's not be sarcastic. I object to having to explain concepts from scratch when you could reasonably be expected to have studied and practiced the basics.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Like I said, my schedule's been tight due to personal issues. I would study the stuff harder if I had the time for it.
mathmale
  • mathmale
You must have the same denominator in 2 fractions BEFORE you can add or subtract them. That's the principle. The next quesion is HOW DO YOU FIND THE LCD? what do you remember? I'm sorry about your having personal issues to deal with.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Add:\[\frac{ 3 }{ 7 }+\frac{ 2 }{ 5 }\]
mathmale
  • mathmale
to find the lcd, multiply the 7 and 5 together.
anonymous
  • anonymous
3/35 + 2/35?
anonymous
  • anonymous
21/35 + 14/35?
mathmale
  • mathmale
The first fraction is 3/7. If you mult. the denom. by 7, you must also mult the numerator by 7. Do that now, please.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Much b etter.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Then simplify?
mathmale
  • mathmale
Looking at the second fraction, whose den. is 5, mult both numerator and den. by 7 .
anonymous
  • anonymous
14/35?
mathmale
  • mathmale
\[\frac{ 3 }{ 7 }+\frac{ 2 }{ 5 }\]
mathmale
  • mathmale
Yes. You've mult both num. and den. of the 2nd fraction by 7. I made a mistake on the first fract. Mult both its num. and den. by 5, please.
anonymous
  • anonymous
10/25?
mathmale
  • mathmale
5 times 3 is 10?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Sorry, 15
anonymous
  • anonymous
15/35
mathmale
  • mathmale
better. Now you have \[\frac{ 15 }{ 35 }+\frac{ 14 }{ 35 }\]
mathmale
  • mathmale
What is the LCD?
anonymous
  • anonymous
the LCD is 35.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Good. Now becasue you have the same den. in both fract., you can add the numerators to get the final answer (the sum)
mathmale
  • mathmale
Do so, please.
anonymous
  • anonymous
The simplified answer should be 29/35, right?
mathmale
  • mathmale
Can't be simplified. Yes, the final answer is 29/35. Congrats.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Now, find the LCD, use it and then add together \[\frac{ 3 }{ 7 }+\frac{ 2 }{ x }\]
mathmale
  • mathmale
the LCD is ... ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
7?
mathmale
  • mathmale
How did you get that? Have you used multiplication here?
anonymous
  • anonymous
7 * x = 7 since I don't know what x represents.
mathmale
  • mathmale
In this case you MUST mult two quantities together. Yes, the LCD is 7x.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Given \[\frac{ 3 }{ 7 }+\frac{ 2 }{ x }\]
mathmale
  • mathmale
by what quantity must you mult. the num. and the den. of the first fract. ? why?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Is this cross multiplication?
mathmale
  • mathmale
No. focus on the 1st fract. Determine by what quant. you must mult. its num. and den.
anonymous
  • anonymous
By x, right?
mathmale
  • mathmale
Exactly. Do so, please.
anonymous
  • anonymous
3x / 7x?
mathmale
  • mathmale
very nice. By what quant. must you mult num. and den. of the 2nd fract?
anonymous
  • anonymous
By x as well?
mathmale
  • mathmale
No. What's the LCD here?\[\frac{ 3 }{ 7 }+\frac{ 2 }{ x }\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
7x
anonymous
  • anonymous
So, 2x/7x?
mathmale
  • mathmale
Thus, mult the num and den of the 2nd fract by what quantity?
anonymous
  • anonymous
By x.
mathmale
  • mathmale
No, we've already used x to modify the 1st fract. Now we are modifying the 2nd fract.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Then, 7?
mathmale
  • mathmale
\[\frac{ 3 }{ 7 }+\frac{ 2 }{ x }\]
mathmale
  • mathmale
Yes. Do so, please.
anonymous
  • anonymous
14/7x
mathmale
  • mathmale
Cool.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Then you have \[\frac{ 3 }{ 7 }+\frac{ 2 }{ x }\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
2x/7x + 14x/7x is what we have now.
mathmale
  • mathmale
or equivalently, \[\frac{ 3x }{ 7x}+\frac{ 14 }{ 7x }\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
17x/7x?
mathmale
  • mathmale
please complete the addition. Note that that's (3x) / (7x), not (2x) / (7x).
mathmale
  • mathmale
How'd you get 17x?
mathmale
  • mathmale
Remember, this is addition.
anonymous
  • anonymous
3x + 14 = 17x
mathmale
  • mathmale
not so. does 1 dime plus 1 quarter equal 2 quarters?
mathmale
  • mathmale
Try again.
mathmale
  • mathmale
3x and 17 are NOT "like terms," so you cannot simplify their sum. You muxst write "3x+17" and let it go at that. So, your final answer is ... what?
anonymous
  • anonymous
3x+14 ------ 7x
mathmale
  • mathmale
Beautiful.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay.
mathmale
  • mathmale
My understanding is that you want to add: x+9/x+1 + x-2/5
anonymous
  • anonymous
Should I send a picture of the problem?
mathmale
  • mathmale
Better expressed as\[\frac{ x+9 }{ x+1 }+\frac{ x+2 }{ 5 }\]
mathmale
  • mathmale
Is that correct?
anonymous
  • anonymous
No. x - 2
mathmale
  • mathmale
\[\frac{ x+9 }{ x+1 }+\frac{ x-2 }{ 5 }\]
mathmale
  • mathmale
better?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Good. What is the lcd?
mathmale
  • mathmale
think back to what you did earlier!
anonymous
  • anonymous
x+5?
mathmale
  • mathmale
Never add or subtract the dens. Always mult or div. It's almost always mult. Try again. LCD= ?
mathmale
  • mathmale
\[\frac{ x+9 }{ x+1 }+\frac{ x-2 }{ 5 }\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
5(x+1)?
mathmale
  • mathmale
Exactly. What did you do to the x+1 and the 5?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm not sure. I just looked at my answers and picked the ones that i didn't add together to get.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Oh, shoot. correct response: I multiplied the 2 different denoms. together to obtain the LCD>
mathmale
  • mathmale
The LCD here is .... ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
x + 6?
anonymous
  • anonymous
If its not the first answer to that question.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Repeat: Do NOT add or subtract the dens. Do not add 1 and 5. You are allowed ONLY to mult or div. NOT to add or subtract.
mathmale
  • mathmale
What is the LCD here?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Then, 5(x+1)
mathmale
  • mathmale
So much better. You got that before, but forgot.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay.
mathmale
  • mathmale
\[\frac{ x+9 }{ x+1 }+\frac{ x-2 }{ 5 }\]
mathmale
  • mathmale
If you mult the den of the 1st fract by 5, you must also mult the num of the first fract by 5.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Do that now, please.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Just show that you have a product; you don't yet have to multiply out the product.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay.
mathmale
  • mathmale
\[\frac{5( x+9) }{ 5*(x+1) }+\frac{ x-2 }{ 5 }\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
x-10/5(x+1)
mathmale
  • mathmale
Now mult num and den of the 2nd fract by (x+1).
mathmale
  • mathmale
Thx for trying but x-10/5(x+1) is not correct.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Mult (x+9) by 5.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Must use parentheses. Picky, picky.
anonymous
  • anonymous
(x+45)
mathmale
  • mathmale
\frac{5( x+9) }{ 5*(x+1) }+\frac{ x-2 }{ 5 }\[\frac{5( x+9) }{ 5*(x+1) }+\frac{ x-2 }{ 5 }\]
mathmale
  • mathmale
Put parentheses around the x-2. Multiply (x+2) by (x+1).
mathmale
  • mathmale
Mult that 5 by (x+1). Use parentheses liberally.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Sorry, is it x-1? You fix it for me, please.
anonymous
  • anonymous
(x-2)5(x+1)?
mathmale
  • mathmale
\[\frac{5( x+9) }{ 5*(x+1) }+\frac{ (x-2)(x+1) }{ 5*(x+1) }\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay.
anonymous
  • anonymous
So, add it together?
mathmale
  • mathmale
Now you have to multiply out 5(x+9) Likewise, you have to mult out (x-2)(x+1). Finally, you have to combine all the like terms. And then y ou're DONE> sorry I have to get off the 'Net NOW, but if you have further questions I'll be back in about an hour. Thanks for your persistence.

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